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51 The family know her as Mary Jane Taylor. Taylor, Elizabeth (I832)
 
52 Tom was in the Army in WW2 and was later a tool & die maker.Had one son.?

Allan just reminded me that I should update your files regarding one of his uncles:
Thomas A. Carswell, b. November 14, 1915 in Clear Lake, Wisconsin & died November 12, 2002 in Minneapolis, Minnesota of leukemia. We made a trip to Wisconsin in 2001 and saw both of Allan's remaining uncles. Tom & John were not in good health, but Tom drove us out to his son, Jay, house for dinner. When he was in the nursing home at the end, he did not want to talk to anyone so I sent him a card. John Basil Carswell, b. November 12, 1918 in Clear Lake, WI is Allan's one remaining uncle.
Georgia.

Thomas A. Carswell
Dunn County News, Sunday, Nov. 24, 2002, A6
Thomas A. Carswell, age 87, of Hopkins, Minn., died Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2002.
He was preceded in death by his wife, Rose.
He will be deeply missed by his son, Jay (Sheila); grandchildren, Gina, Reid, Brady and Lyndsey; a brother, John (Dorothy); other relatives; the Sirnay family; and many friends.
Graveside services are 12:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 25, 2002, at Fort Snelling National Cemetery.
Cremation Society of Minnesota is handling arrangements. 
Carswell, Thomas Alexander (I90)
 
53 !st child Allan of Butley - Farmer at Parklane Prestbury Cheshire then Bailiff at Lyme Park Disley Cheshire
May have moved to Cheshire from Thorterburn Farm Neilston Parish with parents at 5 years of age.


Dwelling: Park House Farm Census Place: Butley, Cheshire, England 1881 Source: FHL Film 1341835 PRO Ref RG11 Piece 3487 Folio 58 Page 11 Marr Age Sex Birthplace Allan CARSWELL M 40 M Scotland Rel: Head Occ: Farmer 4 Labourers (169 Acres) Eliza CARSWELL M 27 F Butley, Cheshire, England Rel: Wife Occ: Housewife Jean CARSWELL 7 F Butley, Cheshire, England Rel: Daur Occ: Scholar Eliza CARSWELL 6 F Butley, Cheshire, England Rel: Daur Occ: Scholar Allan CARSWELL 5 M Butley, Cheshire, England Rel: Son John CARSWELL 4 M Butley, Cheshire, England Rel: Son William CARSWELL 2 M Butley, Cheshire, England Rel: Son Mary Ellen FRITH U 21 F Nixon, Stafford, England Rel: Servant Occ: Domestic Servant Eliza HALPEN U 21 F Ireland Rel: Servant Occ: Domestic Servant William FORMSTONE U 48 M Clutton, Cheshire, England Rel: Servant Occ: Farm Servant (Indoor) Charles DOOLEY 15 M Prestbury, Cheshire, England Rel: Servant Occ: Farm Servant

The family must have moved between the 1885 /6 & 1891 to Plattwood as an agreement between CRB Legh & a James Bostock took place to lease Park House in Jan 1886. Although the silver cup to Leigh was dated 1884 so they could have been at Plattwood then.



1891 Census. Plattwood Farm Lyme Park Disley.
Allan Carswell, Head, Married , 50, Farm Bailiff.born Scotland
Eliza Carswell,Wife,Married, 37, born Cheshire ,Butley
Jean Carswell, daughter, Single,17, born Cheshire Butley
Margaret Carswell ,daughter, single,16.born Cheshire Butley
Allan Carswell, son, single,15, Warehouse apprentice.employed, born Cheshire Butley.
John Carswell, son, 14, scholar, born Cheshire Butley.
William Carswell, son, 12, scholar, born Cheshire Butley.
Thomas Carswell , son, 7, scholar, born Cheshire Lyme Handley.
Robert Carswell, son, 6, scholar,born Cheshire Butley.
Fred Carswell, son, 5,born Cheshire Butley.

1901 Census,Platt Wood Farm,Lyme Park ,Disley.
Allan Carswell ,Head,60, Farm Bailiff, born Scotland.
Florence Carswell ,Wife (second)43,,born Greenfield ,Yorkshire.
John Carswell,Son,24,S,Farmers Son,born Prestbury Cheshire.
William Carswell,son,22,S.,Farmers son,born Prestbury Cheshire.
Robert Carswell,son,16,S.Apprentice Joiner,born Prestbury Cheshire.
Fred Carswell,son,15,School boy,born Prestbury.
Ellen White,Single,19,General domestic servant,born Sutton Macclesfield.

1902 Kellys Commercial Directories of Cheshire , Lyme Hanley, Carswell Allan ,Farm Bailiff to Lord Newton Lyme Park.

1902 Harry Bostock had Park House Farm in 1902- Kelleys Directories. 
Carswell, Allan (I45)
 
54 "In loving memory of John Thomas Heald who died Sept 27th 1936 aged 86 years, also Sarah Anne the beloved wife of John Thomas Heald of Disley who died Nov 21st 1925 aged 73 years.Also Ada their beloved daughter who died Nov 3th 1950 aged 72 years.Also Jinnie beloved wife of J Morris Heald of Stoneridge Disley who died March 7th 1962 aged 78 years."
A small stone on John Carswell's (my grandfather) grave in Disley Churchyard.:- In loving memory of May Heald died 24th December 1967 aged 84 years.

Dwelling: Hague Bar 1881 Census. Census Place: Beard, Derby, England Source: FHL Film 1341829 PRO Ref RG11 Piece 3464 Folio 7 Page 7 Marr Age Sex Birthplace John HEALD M 29 M Marple, Cheshire, England Rel: Head Occ: Calico Blockprinter Sarah HEALD M 28 F Millington, York, England Rel: Wife Ada HEALD 2 F New Mills, Derby, England Rel: Daur James HEALD 2 m M New Mills, Derby, England Rel: Son

1891 Census
1241168Lodge Row HEALD John W Head M 40y Block Printe rCHS Disley
124HEALD Sarah A Wife M 38y YKS Batley
124HEALD Ad aDau-12y Paper Stainer DBY New Mills
124HEALD James W Son 10y Paper Stainer DBY New Mills
124HEALD MaryDau -7y Scholar CHS Disley


1901 Disley Census
1462 Lodge Row HEALD JohnHead M 48 Railway Labourer CHS
-146210 Lodge Row HEALD Sarah Wife M 50 YKS
-146210Lodge Row HEALD Ada DauS 22Cotton Reeler DBY-
146210Lodge Row HEALDMorri sSon S 20 Stone Mason`s Apprentice DBY
Heald, John Thomas (I1310)
 
55 "In loving memory of John Thomas Heald who died Sept 27th 1936 aged 86 years, also Sarah Anne the beloved wife of John Thomas Heald of Disley who died Nov 21st 1925 aged 73 years.Also Ada their beloved daughter who died Nov 3th 1950 aged 72 years.Also Jinnie beloved wife of J Morris Heald of Stoneridge Disley who died March 7th 1962 aged 78 years."
A small stone on John Carswell's (my grandfather) grave in Disley Churchyard.:- In loving memory of May Heald died 24th December 1967 aged 84 years.

Spinster. 
Heald, May (I1651)
 
56 "In loving memory of John Thomas Heald who died Sept 27th 1936 aged 86 years, also Sarah Anne the beloved wife of John Thomas Heald of Disley who died Nov 21st 1925 aged 73 years.Also Ada their beloved daughter who died Nov 3th 1950 aged 72 years.Also Jinnie beloved wife of J Morris Heald of Stoneridge Disley who died March 7th 1962 aged 78 years."
A small stone on John Carswell's (my grandfather) grave in Disley Churchyard.:- In loving memory of May Heald died 24th December 1967 aged 84 years. 
Ann, Sarah (I1649)
 
57 "Janet Carswell 2nd daughter of Allan Carswell died aged 7 years 11 months 7th May 1879." Funeral card from John Carswell Kirkton 1970. Carswell, Janet (I1392)
 
58 (Jeanie Carswell died 19.10.1903 age 39, Darrochside Farm Paisley. Death reg 'd by James Carswell, Widower. Her father James Harvie, farmer, alive, mother Maggie Pattison) Harvie, Jean (I964)
 
59 . Parish Register, Parish of Neilston, David Stevenson & Barbara Craig, spouses, Woodside, had fifth child and third
son born on the 25th of November and baptised on the 24th of December, named Thomas.



1861 Census.
Peasweep Inn .
David Stevenson, Married, 58, Spirit Dealer born Neilston.
Barbara, Wife, age 56, born Paisley.
Janet Stevenson ,Daughter, Unmarried, age 28, Dairy Maid.
Thomas Stevenson, age 17, Grocer Shopman , born Neilston.

Later a spirit merchant Source RR.

At time of marriage residence was in Abbey Parish.
In 1871 residence in Royal Bank Building Johnstone.

Occupation: Grocer, Flesher, Wine Merchant - sometime Provost of Johnstone(?) 
Stevenson, Thomas (I1136)
 
60 . Parish Register, Parish of Neilston, Stevenson and Craig:David Stevenson in Neilston Parish & Barbara Craig in
Mearns Parish, having produced certification of proclamation of banns, were married at Balgraystone the 3rd of June
1831 by the Revd. Hugh Stirling Minister. 
Family F336
 
61 . Source Johan Lochridge.
She was a pupil teacher, single age 21, died 14 May 1879 at Burnitshields? Kilbarchan. Father William Carswell, deceased, mother Janet ms Lang. She died of Phthisis (TB) about 1 year, cerebral Effusion about 6 days? Eliz. Lang Aunt was present 
Carswell, Agnes Howie (I851)
 
62 10 1863 CARSWELL ISABELLA MITCHELL F 6 NEILSTON /RENFREW 572/00 0010
Probably died 1863 aged 6 in Neilston.SP 
Carswell, Isabella (I560)
 
63 10064/1931 COCKS LESLIE B SMALLMAN NANCY GOSFORD  Family F194
 
64 10409/1858 ROUGHLEY JOSEPH JOSEPH SARAH J PARRAMATTA not proven Roughley, Joseph (I1428)
 
65 10674/1892 HAWKINS ANNIE WILLIAM R AMY E CENTRAL CUMBERLAND Hawkins, Annie (I1422)
 
66 10721/1867 RUPRECHT JOHN JOHN BARBARA MANNING RIVER

Grew up on Mitchells Island. Worked for 47 years for lower Manning Dairy co-op - fourty years boat driver collecting milk & cream. 
Ruprecht, John (I1482)
 
67 10th child ,6th son.Master Butcher Barrhead. Had daughter Jean ( info from James Carswell Kirkcudbright)(www.chocs-online.co.uk)

1851 Census shows him aged 17, unmarried & a flesher living with his brother Robert in Barrhead.

1861 Census Neilston.
Main St Barrhead. Alexander Carswell Head. Married 26 Flesher born Neilston.
Elizabeth Carswell Wife 23 born Kilbarchan.
Ann Carswell Daug. 1 born Barrhead.

CountryCode GB RepCode 234 Repository National Archives of Scotland Reference Title Precognition against Alexander Carswell for the crime of culpable homicide Date 1853 Accused Alexander Carswell, Age: 19, flesher, Address: Barrhead, Neilston, Renfrewshire AccessStatus Open PlaceName(plans) /Scotland FindingAids 19th Century Solemn Database ??

Trial of Alexander Carswell

Excerpts from witness statements

Mrs Agnes Allan or Wilson, Wife of Spirit Dealer:

Andrew Easdon, weaver, residing in Barrhead now deceased was in my house accompanied by his brother James, Thomas Smith, Stewart Cochran and a man named Reoch. They came in at 7 or 8 and left shortly before 11 o'clock. They had no spirits in my house but strong ale off the butt…….. I don't think they had 2 pints each. They all appeared sober except the deceased. He was staggering and feeble -like and apparently unable to do any harm … Neither did I ever hear him quarrel with anyone in my house…….deceased went away with his brother as aforesaid, and while I was coming out of a room in my house, I saw the deceased on the street, and the accused, Alexander Carswell on horse-back beside him in the act of quickly turning the horse about. Carswell then looked at deceased and said something to him which I did not hear, on which deceased staggered back and said "Ye flesher B - r I could fight you and your horse". Carswell then rode on homeward, and deceased and his brother went away as aforesaid after having got some matches which he asked from me. After they went away a Mrs McKechnie came across to me. She said it was a pity of deceased for he was a snarly fellow whoever he was who was on horseback for she heard him say that he knew deceased and that he would be…………..

James Easdon

James Easdon, Weaver, residing in Barrhead aforesaid aged 35 years says, Andrew Easdon, Weaver, residing in Barrhead now deceased and aged 22 years past was my brother and I was in his company on the night of Monday the 13 June 1853 in the house of Mrs Wilson, a witness. Thomas Smith, Stewart Cochran and James Reoch were with us there. William McKechnie and David Easdon were also there with us. We went into Mrs Wilson's about 6 o'clock at night and left shortly before 11. We drank no whisky there. It was ale off the butt we drank. We had a good deal of it. I cannot say how much we had, but I think we might have had about 10 tankards in all. I was a little tipsy when I left, but I could walk well enough and knew what I was doing. I think that all the rest were in much the same state as myself excepting the deceased who was fully worse than rest. The deceased and Stewart Cochran went out first. I stood in the shop a little and Thomas Smith and some others including Reoch were in the kitchen of the shop at that time. David Easdon and I then left Wilson's house and went up the street together. I don't know where my brother Andrew was then. He did not go away with me from Wilson's at all and I saw no one on horseback on the road near to Wilson's.
When David Easdon and I were going up the street we met a man named McCallum and went into a public house with him, where we remained about half an hour and leaving it I saw Smith, Cochran and Reoch carrying my brother, Andrew to the…..

William Carswell

William Carswell, Flesher, residing in Barrhead aforesaid, aged 29 years says, About 11 o'clock of the night of Monday the 13 June 1853 my brother, Alexander came home on horseback and put the horse into the stable. He did not come in after putting up the horse but went out the close to the street and I heard him speaking to Garroway outside. I went to bed. I heard a quarrelling and noise on the street then I went out in my shirt and found my brother and Garroway in front of the shop and three men lying on the opposite side of the road. I knew none of them. I put on my trousers and went out again. I saw one of the three men attempting to lift another of them but did not succeed and he stepped aside from the others, on which the other got up and staggered towards the middle of the road and fell both of them in each others arms and made a noise. I then heard an expression as to how they would get up, or if nobody would help them up or something, to that effect. On which Garroway said that if they got a lick on the leg it would do better than helping them up. On which one of them looked up and swore Garroway and said that he was his man and asked him if Garroway thought he could do it. He then threw off his coat, came running forward and in place of striking Garroway he struck my brother on the face, a blow with his fist. On which my brother struck him a blow with his fist about the face which knocked him down. The man then seized my brother by the legs and attempted to pull the legs from him. I then caught my brother by the arm and pulled him back and kept him. The man then got up and came running towards us when my brother gave him a shove with his hand he fell all his length. I took my brother into the house then and I saw no more of the man. I did not know him. I seized no one but my brother back from the man. I heard a person say there was no use meddling with a drunk chap. I said that he ought to take him away if he was drunk. The above is all that I saw. I saw no kicks and had there been any such I must have seen it. All which is truth. William Carswell

Declaration of Alexander Carswell at Paisley the 16 June 1853 in presence of Robert Robertson, Glasgow, Esquire, Advocate Sheriff Substitute of the County of Renfrew, Com..? a Prisoner, who, being examined Declares as follows, My nane is Alexander Carswell. I am a flesher and reside at Barrhead. I am 19 years of age. I knew Andrew Easdon by sight. On Monday last, I was up at Broom and returned to Barrhead about eleven at night, I was trotting along the street, when Easdon came out of Wilson's public house, and struck my horse on the face with his bonnet. The horse was a young animal and started back. He ran at the horse again and tried to get me off and fight with him. I got past him at last and rode home. I put up my horse and went into the house. I was going to bed when I heard a noise in the street. I opened the door to see what it was. I saw Easdon and another man rolling about on the road as if they were drunk. A man who was passing lifted up Easdon twice, but he fell down again each time, as if unable to stand. I continued looking at them and was joined by William Garroway, Baker, and my brother, William. The two men rolled to about the middle of the street. Garroway said to them that the best way to send them home would be to give them a good beating. Easdon looked up and asked if he thought he could do it. Garroway said he thought he could, upon which Easdon jumped up and rushed at him. Garroway stepped back and Easdon ran at me, and struck me with his fist on the side of the head. I struck him about the face in return. He came against me with his head and tried to throw me over his head. I gave him another blow which knocked him down, and I went into the house leaving him there. I did not kick him. All which I declare to be truth, three words deleted.
(Signed) Alexander Carswell, R Robertson, Glasgow, David McFarlane, D McPhee and Thos. McArthur.

Copy Medical Report. Paisley 20 June 1853
He the undersigned, on the afternoon of 16th Instant, in a house occupied by George Easdon, weaver in Newton Ralston, vicinity of Barrhead, made a post mortem examination of the body of Andrew Easdon, weaver aged about 23 years.
The lips, cheeks and front of the chest and belly were lived and in parts greenish from progressing decomposition, at the back part of the left elbow…….



Concluded Sequestration Processes under 1856 Bankruptcy (Scotland) Act Concluded Sequestration Processes under 1856 Act CountryCode GB RepCode 234 Repository National Archives of Scotland Reference Title Alexander Carswell, Strathbungo, Renfrewshire, Butcher Date 1881 Description Start date: 10/06/1878 AccessStatus Open DeptCipher A10885 ??

Alexander Carswell Flesher Strathbungo mrntioned in Thomas Carswell (1798-1879) Neilstonside Will.


Dwelling: Campvale Cottage 1881 Census Census Place: Cathcart, Renfrew, Scotland Source: FHL Film 0203567 GRO Ref Volume 560 EnumDist 7 Page 41 Marr Age Sex Birthplace Alexander CARSWELL M 46 M Thornliebank, Renfrew, Scotland Alexander Carswell & Elizabeth Purdon? with children Alex ,Jean & Elizabeth. Rel: Head Occ: Butcher (Master) Elizabeth CARSWELL M 43 F Milliken Mill, Renfrew, Scotland Rel: Wife Alexander CARSWELL 14 M Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland Rel: Son Occ: Scholar Allan CARSWELL 9 M Strathbungo, Renfrew, Scotland Rel: Son Occ: Scholar Matthew CARSWELL 7 M Strathbungo, Renfrew, Scotland Rel: Son Occ: Scholar Annie CARSWELL U 21 F Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland Rel: Daur Occ: Shopkeeper Jane CARSWELL U 19 F Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland Rel: Daur Occ: Shopkeeper Elizabeth CARSWELL U 17 F Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland Rel: Daur Maggie CARSWELL U 12 F Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland Rel: Daur Occ: Scholar Agnes CARSWELL 5 F Strathbungo, Renfrew, Scotland Rel: Daur Jessie CARSWELL 3 F Crossmyloof, Renfrew, Scotland Rel: Daur William MACALISTER M 24 M Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland Rel: Serv Occ: Butcher (Assistant)

Alexander Carswell, spirit dealer, married to Helen Hutcheson, died September 5, 1891 at 38 Argyle Street Rothesay, usual residence, Travellers Rest Neilston. Male age 57 yrs, Allan C Farmer Decd (Father) Jean S Decd (Mother) Cause ? of Liver & Jaundice and more. John Anderson Son in law Present
.
16 March 1886 at 21 Grafton Street Glasgow after banns etc Alexander Carswell Spirit Merchant Widower age 51, Main Street Neilston Allan C Farmer etc to Helen Hutcheson or Curtis, Spirit Merchant Widow age 40, 9 garden street Glasgow daughter of James Hutcheson Spirit Merchant decd and Janet Campbell previously Hutcheson nee Young (decd) witnesses Thomas Anderson and Janet Hutcheson.
And
on 6 October 1886 at Broadlie Neilston, John Anderson, Writer age 31 to Elizabeth Carswell age 23, daughter of Alex C and Eliz Purdon (Decd). etc

Dear John,
had a great day in Edinburgh, I have had 10 pages (excerpts from Witness statements mostly) photocopied and will scan them and send them on, not this evening though. In short:
Alexander rode home one night on his young horse and met with a few drunks near his home. There was some sort of altercation and one drunk was heard to say " Ye flesher B - r (Bugger?) I could fight you and your horse" After Alex put the horse in the stable he went back onto the street where there was a set to (my description). During the quarrel Alex's brother, William came out onto the street, wearing only his shirt. He went back indoors and put his trousers on, and back outside was instrumental in separating his brother from the other man, who was Andrew Easdon age 22 and a weaver. Unfortunately Andrew Easdon died less than 2 days later from his injuries to his belly. I think Andrew Easden probably threw the first punch and that was maybe why Alex was found not guilty.
The bankruptcy papers were not available, I will need to order them ahead the next time I visit. The trip was worthwhile if only for the quote made by Andrew Easdon! Poor soul, didn't know who he was meddling with. You will get the photocopies eventually Cheerio for now Johan

Monday, went to the archives.
I can't pretend to understand all that I was reading but it looked like Alex Carswell, Butcher, Strathbungo, owed money to an Archibald Hamilton, Butcher, Gallowgate Glasgow, who took action against him. He could have gone to prison over the debts. There was a mention of William L Bruce, Farmer, Glenkiln, Lamlash, Arran, who may have helped him out. That was in June 1878
Other creditors then came into the picture: There was a William Stevenson, Househill Quarry, Nitshill, Glasgow, and a John McIntyre, Fruiterer, Glasgow. In 1878 Alex offered to pay 2/6 for every pound owed.
There was then a big list of creditors, including horse trainers, spirit dealers, farmers (even his uncle Thomas from Wraes), cattle salesmen, horse dealers, and the William Bruce, above.
In May 1879 he offered to pay3/4 per pound on his debts and to pay expenses. There was then a statement "He undertook to grant in their favour an assignation of his whole right and interest under the trust deposition and settlement of his late uncle, Thomas Carswell, Farmer, Wraes in the parish of Neilston to be held and any sums they may recover there."
(So it looks like Thomas didn't leave all his estate to his young wife.)
Then there was more from 1883, Flesher, Barrhead and Wine and Spirit Merchant, Neilston. Sequestration was awarded. This time the creditor was David Riddell, Dealer in horses, Kennedy Street, Glasgow. Source Johan Lochridge fron NAS Edinburgh. 
Carswell, Alexander (I48)
 
68 1118/1875 BENNETT JOHN WILLIAM FAGAN ANNIE SY Family F70
 
69 12101/1871 RUPRECHT WILLIAM LEWIS JOHN MARTIN SARAH BARBARA MANNING RIVER Ruprecht, William Lewis (I1484)
 
70 12146/1918 THOMPSON SIDNEY R HAWKINS FLORRIE HORNSBY  Family F452
 
71 14099/1915 LLEWELLYN ERNEST H HAWKINS ANNIE SYDN Family F451
 
72 15324/1912 MOORE ROBERT FAGAN SYLVIA PARRAMATTA  Family F55
 
73 1550/1917 HAWKINS ROWLAND A PHILLIPS RUBY M M ROCKDALE  Family F447
 
74 15513/1913 RUPREGHT WILLIAM H HAWKINS ELLA B PARRA Family F457
 
75 1834 Commercial Directories for Neilston show Thomas & William Carswell ,farmers Craig of Neilston
Farmed later at 'The Craig of Neilston'

1841 Census,
Craig of Neilston.William Carswell age 45,farmer ,born Renfrewshire.
Alexander Carswell 20, born Renfrew. 'Son of James C.& Janet Sproul'
James Carswell 9, born Renfrew. 'Son of James Carswell & Jean Andrew'.
William Smith, 35, Ag Lab. born Renfrew.
Agnes Kirkwood,30,Female Servant,born Renfrew.
Margaret Kirkwood,30, Female Servant,born Renfrew.
Thora Gillies,20,Servant, not born Renfrew.
Janet McInneinnies ,20, Ag Lab born Renfrewshire.


At his brother Roberts death in 1845 he was farming at Craig of Neilston.Mentioned in Will.

1851 Census
Craig of Neilston- William Carswell , Head, unmarried, ,55,farmer of 290 acres employing 2 labourers.b. Neilston.
1796Allan & Janet Caldwell of Nookfoot. Thomas's notes supports Allan & Agnes.
-Janet Carswell, Neice,unmarried,26, farmers neice ! born Neilston.(b.1824,daug of James, Vintner & Janet Spruel )
-Alexander Carswell,Nephew, 30, farmers nephew,born Neilston.(b. 1820,son of James & Janet Spruel)(Sandy of Kirkton)
-Elizabeth Stevenson ,Neice ,unmarried, 15, farmers neice. born Neilston. (b.1836,daug of Hugh Stevenson & Margaret Carswell)
+ 2 labourers,1 errand boy & 2 house servants.


1861 Neilston Census:-
Craig of Neilston- William Carswell Head Married- 65 Farmer of 280 acres born Neilston.
Janet Carswell - Wife 33 born Kilbarchankan.
Mary Carswell Daughter 1 born Neilston.
Elizabeth Carswell Daughter 3 Months born Neilston.
David Desumpter Servant Un Married 17 Ag Labourer born Neilston
Andrew Watson " " 17 " " born Dumbarton
Archibald McIntyre " " 26 Ploughman born Islay.
Jane Morrison " " 21 Domestic Servant born Islay
Mary Cameron " " 31 " " born Fort William.
Catherine Campbell " " 18 General servant born Islay.
Rebecca Henderson " " 15 " " born Renfrew.

1871 Census
Craig of Neilston, William Carswell ,Head, 75, Farmer of 280 acres employing 2 ag lab & 1 boy, born Neilston.
Janet Carswell, Wife, 44, born Kilbarchan.
Betty Carswell, Daug, 10 Scholar, born Neilston.
Maggie Carswell, Daug, 8, Scholar, born Neilston.
William Hamilton, Servant, unmarried, 17, born Neilston.
Neil CasKie,Servant,Un marr.16 ,born Islay Argyll.
Catherine McKechnie, Servant,Un Marr. 25, Argyllshire.
Anne Shaw, Servant, Unmarried, 23, Glascow.
Maggie CasKie,Servant,Un married, 17, born Argyllshire.

1881Census. William must have died between 1871 & 1881.
Dwelling: Holehouse
Census Place: Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Source: FHL Film 0203579 GRO Ref Volume 572-1 EnumDist 7 Page 25
Marr Age Sex Birthplace
Janet CARSWELL W 54 F Kilbarchan, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Head
Elizabeth CARSWELL U 20 F Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Daur
Occ: Overwinder Cotton Thread Mill
Margaret CARSWELL U 18 F Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Daur
Occ: Overwinder Cotton Thread Mill

Carswell William 24/7/1878 Farmer, Craig of Neilston, near Neilston, d. 29/01/1878 at Craig of Neilston aforesaid, intestate Paisley Sheriff Court. His estate was valued at 791 Pounds & 11 Shillings. Source:- Scottish Documents.

From Old Clyesdale Stud Books - Source Johan Lochridge.

The late William Carswell of Craig of Neilston bred "Darling of Laggan", (the property of Hugh Stevenson, Laggan, Islay and John Dunlop, Laggan, Islay) sire Prince of Renfrew, dam Campsie. Then, J Dunlop, H Brackenridge, T McLaughlan, Brussels Ontario bred "King of the Isles, sire Pride of Islay, dam Darling of Laggan.
How about that then? Hugh S would have been nephew of William C and I think I know from Hugh S death record that J Dunlop was his nephew. Don't know whether it was on mother or father's side of the family though. But it is interesting though. I had previously checked the 1881 census on Islay, but Jimmy gave away the old PC and I could not re-instal the census on the new machine. I will get another disc one day. Johan.

Dear John,
Thanks for the site, haven't found anything yet, but maybe one day I will.
I went back to the Clydesdale Stud Books, here are 2 entries relating to John Dunlop, perhaps I sent them to you before, sorry, I just find them quite interesting. My mother has said that her great uncle John McKay went to Islay every year when she was young. I wonder if he went horse dealing.
1888 Edition which will interest you:
Mare: Darling of Laggan: light brown, white stripe on face, near hind leg white, foaled 1875. Bred by the late Wm Carswell, Craig of Neilston (Renfrewshire)( He was uncle of Hugh Stevenson): property of (1) Hugh Stevenson, Laggan (2) John Dunlop, Laggan, Islay; Sire Prince of Renfrew, dam by Campsie.
This mare had a colt in June 1885 King of the Isles, breeders, J Dunlop; H Brackenridge; T McLaughlan, Brussels, Ont.
Also an entry in 1890 edition which reads:
Stallion: Hopetoun Lad, light bay, white star on face, little white on pastern. Foaled (born) July 1886.
Bred by John Fleming, Old Crookston, Hurlet, Paisley (about a mile from Barrhead).
Property of John Dunlop, Laggan, Bowmore, Islay.
Sire, Lord Hopetoun, Dam (mother) Maggie of Crookston, by Prince of Renfrew.
I had hoped to connect to that John Fleming above, but you sent me the 1881 Census, so I had to discount that.
Ah well, such is life
Cheers
Johan 
Carswell, William (I33)
 
76 1834 Commercial Directories for Neilston show Thomas & William Carswell ,farmers Craig of Neilston.

1841 Census.
Piece: SCT1841/572 Place: Neilston-Renfrewshire Enumeration District: 3 Civil Parish: Neilston Ecclesiastical Parish, Village or Island: - Folio: 3 Page: 1 Address: Capelly Surname First name(s) Sex Age Occupation Where Born Remarks
CARSWELL Thomas M 40 Farmer Renfrewshire
STEVENSON John M 20 Ag Lab Renfrewshire
MCNEIL Malcolm M 20 Ag Lab Outside Census County (1841)
CAMPBELL Daniel M 18 Ag Lab Outside Census County (1841)
MCNAB Effie F 20 Female Servant Outside Census County (1841)
PATTERSON Janet F 15 Female Servant Renfrewshire


1845 . Mentioned in brother Roberts Will as from Capilly.

1851 Census showed Thomas at West Neilstonside age 51 ( of 111 acres employing 2 labourers.)
Mary Henderson listed as house servant aged 22.

Farmed at Neilstonside. Was at Neilstonside when he married Mary Henderson in 1854.

1861 Census
Neilstonside (not West) Thomas Carswell Head Marr. 61 Farmer of 136 acres employing 1 Labourer b. Neilston
Mary Wife 33 b. Ardnanum Argyll.
James Brown Boarder 3 Mrs Brown ? b. Neilston
Anne Curry Servant 21 Dairy Maid b. Islay
Mary Johnson " 28 " " b. Ireland.
James Mc Intyre " 18 Farm Lab. b. "
Thomas Harrison " 19 " "

1871 Census
Neilstonside Farm.
Thomas Carswell , Head, Married, 72, Farmer of 137 acres all arable employing 3 men,1 boy & 2 women.
Mary Carswell, Wife, 43,
James Brown,Neices son. 13 .
Donald Stewart,Nephew, 9,
Allan Stewart, Visitor,Marr, 40. Upholster.
Flora Stewart, wife of Visitor Marr 36. formally Flora Henderson married 8th Feb 1861 Aharache Argyll
Isabella Stewart, daug of Visitor, 7.
John Stewart, son of Visitor, 4.
Hugh Stewart ,son of Visitor, 2.
Margaret Stewart, daug of Visitor, 2.
Donald Cameron, General Servant, unmarr. ,22
Janet McHennon, Servant, unmarr. 24.
Christina Keith, Servant, unmarried, 20.

Thomas was at Wraes Neilston when he wrote his will 1876 & revised it on Dec 31 1877.Andrew Gilmour, David Osbourne &,Mathew Anderson were the Trustees.He left 3000 pounds to his wife & the residue of his estate to :-
Allan Carswell Factor residing at Adlington Hall Cheshire.
John Carswell Farmer Chasetown Staffordshire.
William Carswell, Flesher, Barrhead.
Alexander Carswell Flesher Strathbungo.
Margaret Carswell or McKay widow of the late John McKay, Farmer in Barrhead.
Jean Stevenson or Stewart residing in Neilston, Widow of Allan Stewart Farmer of Greenhill in the Parish of Neilston.
Margaret Stevenson or Doig Wife of Henry Doig Dairyman Rutherglen Loan Glasgow.
Janet Stevenson or Lindsay wife of Walter Lindsay, Dairyman , Thistle Street Glasgow.
Elizabeth Stevenson , Domestic Servant,With Thomas Leburn Arnot Laurel Bank, Partick.
Isabella Stevenson or McWee wife of McWee Land Steward Cheshire.
Isabella Kirkwood of StewartWife of Robert Stewart , Taylor, Barrhead.
Jean Kirkwood or McAllister, Widow of John McAllister, Ironmonger of Barrhead.
Margaret Carswell or Craig Widow of William Craig, Surfaceman, residing in Pollockshaws.
Jessie Carswell or Hamilton wife of George Hamilton Farmer residing in Killock in the Parish of Neilston.
Jean Carswell or Brown , Spirit Dealer Neilston wife of Widow of James Brown sometime spirit dealer there.
Margaret Carswell & Elizabeth Carswell both daughters of & residing with William Carswell, Farmer Craig of Neilston.
Alexander Carswell Farmer of the Kirkton( originally left Luckies Fauld, 4 acres ajoining Kirkton but will was amended as it was sold & the proceeds added to residue of estate.)


Thomas Carswell died 16th Feb 1879 @ 1.20 am at Wraes Neilston aged 80 of Enlarged prostate 2 years & irritability of bladder 2 months,certified by John McKinlay MD.Informant Donald Stewart Nephew. John Carswell Registrar on 17th Feb 1879.

District of Neilston County of Renfrew
No Name and Surname Rank or Profession, Single, Married or Widowed When and Where Died Sex Age Name, Surname and Rank or Profession of Father Name and Maiden Surname of Mother Cause of Death, Duration of Disease and Medical Attendant by whom Certified Signature and Qualification of Informant and Residence When and Where Registered
572/1 19 Thomas Carswell Farmer Married to Mary Henderson 16th February 1879 1h 20m AM Wraes ?? Neilston M 80 Allan Carswell Farmer deceased Agnes Carswell MS Howie deceased Enlargement of prostate 2 years Irritability of bladder 2 months Certified by John MacKinlay MD Donald Stewart Nephew (present) 17th Feb 1879 at Neilston John Carswell Registrar






James Brown
Event(s):
Birth: 11 SEP 1825 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland

Christening: 02 OCT 1825 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland

Death: 22 AUG 1862 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland

Burial:

Parents:
Father: James Brown Family
Mother: Margaret Barr



From IGI
Father: James Brown, Mother: Jane Carswell , Married 24 Feb 1857

could be the daug of James Carswell ,spirit dealer or John Carswell the beadle.


1. Alexander BROWN Gender: M Birth: 14 Jan 1859 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland 2. Janet BROWN F Birth: 29 May 1860 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
3. James BROWN Birth: 19 May 1857 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
4. Alexander BROWN Birth: 14 Jan 1859 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland 5. Janet BROWN Birth: 29 May 1860 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
6. Margaret Barr BROWN Birth: 20 Mar 1862 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland 7. Janet BROWN Birth: 29 May 1860 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland.

1881 Census.

Dwelling: 79 Prince Albert Bldgs
Census Place: Edinburgh St Cuthberts, Edinburgh, Scotland
Source: FHL Film 0224001 GRO Ref Volume 685-3 EnumDist 54 Page 23
Marr Age Sex Birthplace
Jean POW U 67 F Yarrow, Selkirk, Scotland
Rel: Head
Occ: Lodging House Keeper
Euphemia POW U 79 F Yarrow, Selkirk, Scotland
Rel: Sister
Occ: Retired Cook
John MC EWAN U 38 M Killin, Perth, Scotland
Rel: Lodger
Occ: Coopers Labourer
James BROWN U 23 M Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland Possible our James.
Rel: Lodger
Occ: Brewers Labourer 
Carswell, Thomas (I35)
 
77 1841 Census
Piece: SCT1841/572 Place: Neilston-Renfrewshire Enumeration District: 1 Civil Parish: Neilston Ecclesiastical Parish, Village or Island: - Folio: 1 Page: 1 Address: Low Bogside

Surname First name(s) Sex Age Occupation Where Born Remarks STEVENSON John M 55 Farmer Renfrewshire STEVENSON Jean F 45 Outside Census County (1841) STEVENSON John M 25 Ag Lab Renfrewshire STEVENSON Jean F 20 Renfrewshire STEVENSON Janet F 15 Outside Census County (1841) STEVENSON James M 14 Renfrewshire STEVENSON Agnes F 10 Renfrewshire STEVENSON David M 7 Renfrewshire 
Wark, Jean (I757)
 
78 1841 Census
Woodneuk: Mrs Carswell 45 Farmer born Renfrew.
Agnes Carswell 20 "
John Carswell 20 "
Robert Carswell 15.
Thomas Carswell 10.
Alexander Carswell 8.


Said to be cousin of the father of Robert Louis Stevenson.( Marjory's letters) Local directories show her living at Thorterburn Farm as a widow in 1836. The census of 1851 shows her living at Woodneuk Farm with son William aged 26 & daughter Margaret 24 years. . She died at Cross Arthurlie farm in 1877 aged 88 years. Her daughter Margaret Jane registered her death.

1861 Census Neilston.
Main St. Barrhead.Jean Carswell Head Widow 67 House Keeper born Neilston.
Robert Carswell Son Unmarried 37 Grocer born Neilston.

1871 Census shows her living with her son Robert & daughter in law Agnes in Barrhead.

Death SP25 1877 CARSWELL JEAN STEVENSON F 88 BARRHEAD /RENFREW 572/02 0102 
Stevenson, Jean (I36)
 
79 1841 census .
Thorterburn: Allan Carswell 25 born Renfrew.
Jane Carswell 25. "
Allan Carswell 11 months ? "
William Carswell 15 Years
Janet Carswell 15 Years
Mary McDonald 20 Ag Lab, Not born in Renfrewshire.
Janet Lochhead 12 Ag Lab No
Archibald Gillespie Ag Lab No

I think William b.1824(flesher Barrhead)was Allan & Jean Stevensons son & Janet b.1824 was the daughter of James Carswell & Janet Spruel. So the girl lived with her aunt & uncle at Thorterburn before working & living at the Craig


1881 Census.
Dwelling: Killoch Cottage
Census Place: Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Source: FHL Film 0203579 GRO Ref Volume 572-1 EnumDist 3 Page 1
Marr Age Sex Birthplace
George HAMILTON M 53 M Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Head
Occ: Cowfeeder
Janet HAMILTON M 56 F Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Wife
Occ: Cowfeeder Wife
William HAMILTON U 27 M Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Son
Occ: Carter
George HAMILTON U 23 M Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Son
Occ: Carrier
Janet HAMILTON U 21 F Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Daur
Occ: Cowfeeders Daur
Ann HAMILTON U 19 F Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Daur
Occ: Cowfeeders Daur
Jane HAMILTON U 16 F Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Daur Handicap: Imbecile
Occ: Cowfeeders Daur

Mentioned in Thomas Carswells Will 1879 " Jessie Carswell or Hamilton, Wife of George Hamilton Farmer residing in Killock in the Parish of Neilston. " Cheshire Thomas said in a letter that she may have burnt the family bible!!

Regarding the Bible - The bible I have is the bible of Ann Gilmour who married William Hamilton on 24 July 1803 and whose 9th child, George, born 30 August 1837.died 18 March 1888, married Janet Carswell, dob ? died 25 December 1901. The size of this bible indicates to me that she probably carried it at her wedding.
I will be sending to you a copy of the pages of this bible with the wedding and childrens birth details, with typed copy, Copy of the Hamilton part of a tree set of by Wm Hamilton of Niagara Falls several years ago. Th 1st family on it was cleared up by Ann's bible and I made up a new part of the tree ( attached ).
The info you have provided, starting with the 1851 census report, is most interesting for me and will enhance that part of the tree I am building.
Besides a handmade tree, I am also building one on the 'Genes Reunited' web site at ?
I will also attach copies of the Hamilton family of George and Mary (Bruce) Hamilton, and the Holehouse farm house from early last century.( I have to find them in the attic!!! )
All the best for a happy and healthy New Year. John ( Iain ). P.S. Which one are you in the photo?

Death.15 1901 CARSWELL JESSIE HAMILTON F 77 NEILSTON /RENFREW 
Carswell, Janet (I793)
 
80 1841 census .
Thorterburn: Allan Carswell 25 born Renfrew.
Jane Carswell 25. "
Allan Carswell 11 months ? "
William Carswell 15 Years
Janet Carswell 15 Years
Mary McDonald 20 Ag Lab, Not born in Renfrewshire.
Janet Lochhead 12 Ag Lab No
Archibald Gillespie Ag Lab No

I think William b.1824(flesher Barrhead)was Allan & Jean Stevensons son & Janet b.1824 was the daughter of James Carswell & Janet Spruel. So the girl lived with her aunt & uncle at Thorterburn before working & living at the Craig


Arrived in England in 1845 from the farm' Thorterburn' Neilston Parish .to be Estate Agent for the Leighs of Adlington
From Neilston Parish Records.:- 21-?-1837 Allan Carswell ,farmer Thorterburn and Elizabeth Sproul(daug of Andrew Sproul & Mary Young.?) of Jaapston had an illegitimate son born 21-? 1837 and baptised 17 th April 1838 named William.
1841 Census :Jaapston : William Sproul 83 Farmer born Renfrewshire.
Mary Sproul 70
Robert 40, Andrew 35, Janet,32, Elizabeth 30, Jean 25, & William Carswell age 3 ,all born in Renfrewshire

ELIZABETH SPROULE - Paisley ELIZABETH SPROULE MARRIED A HENRY ROSE( HIS BIRTH NAME WAS WILLIAN ARTHUR ROWE ) BORN 1838 WHITSTABLE KENT UK. AS THE STORY GOES ELIZABETH SPROULE WAS ABOARD AN IMMIGRANT SHIP COMING TO NZ AND WAS JILTED, MET UP WITH HENRY ROSE. ELIZABETH SPROULE SMOKED A LONG PIPE. ELIZABETH DIED IN 1900 AT MILTON OTAGO NZ. ANY MORE INFO ON ELIZABETH SPROULES LIFE IN PAISLEY SCOTLAND AND HER PARENTS WOULD BE APPRECIATED.

The 1851 Census shows Robert 54(born Neilston) & Agnes Spruel 42 (born Eastwood) at Jaapston .The 1851 Census also shows young William Carswell living with his unmarried Aunt Janet Sproul & Uncle William Sproul. Young William Carswell married Mary Walker ,at Neilston 30 March 1866. They had 4 children ,Jeanie,,Jessie, William & Alexander(died in Childhood)Jeanie & Jessie emigrated to USA in 1885-90.- Genforum.
Dwelling: 117 Rose St 1881 Census Place: Govan, Lanark, Scotland Source: FHL Film 0203670 GRO Ref Volume 644-11 EnumDist 19 Page 6 Marr Age Sex Birthplace 1881
William CARSWELL M 43 M Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Head
Occ: Scale Board Cutter
Mary CARSWELL M 42 F Govan, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Wife
William S. CARSWELL 14 M Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland
Rel: Son
Occ: Scholar
Jeanie CARSWELL 10 F Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland
Rel: Daur
Occ: Scholar
Jessie CARSWELL 7 F Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland
Rel: Daur
Occ: Scholar

From Neilston Parish Records." Allan Carswell farmer Thorterburn & Elizabeth Sproul of Jaapston had an illegitimate son born on 21 ? 1837 & baptised 17th April 1838 named William."
Sproul William 8/12/1842 Farmer Residing at Iaapston Paisley Sheriff Court Wills from www.scottishdocuments.com possibly Eliz Sprouls father.





The 1851 Census shows William living in the Village of Neilston "Sproul Janet Head U 43 Cowfeeder RWF Neilston. Sproul William Brother U 36 Ag Lab RWF Neilston. Carswell William Nephew U 13 Schollar RWF Neilston"

William Carswell married Mary Walker 30 March 1866 at Neilston. Willie Sproul Carswell their son was christened 15 Aug 1866 at High Church Glascow.

His mother Elizabeth was born in 6 April 1808 to William Sproul & Margaret Gilmour. Other children were Margaret b.8 May 1793, Barbara b. 16 Oct 1794, Robert b.28 Jan 1797, Helen b.20 Feb 1798 , Margaret b.8 Mar 1799, Mary or Marion b.4 April 1801, Andrew b. 24 May 1803, Janet b. 1 Aug 1805 , ELIZ b.6 April 1808. Jean b. 28-12 1810, William b.14 Jan 1814.

!6-8-1839. Allan Carswell farmer Thorterburn and Jane Gemmell of Commore both of this Parish were booked for proclamation of banns the third of August and after being regularly proclaimed ,no objections offered were married at Commore the 16th August 1839 by Rev. Hugh Stirling Minister Unit Session Church Newton of Mearns.

1851 Census
Park House Farm Adlington.Cheshire.
Allan Carswell Head, married, 37, Farmer of 171 Acres, employing 7 Labourers,Born Scotland.
Jane Carswell, Wife, married, 35, Farmers wife.
Allan Carswell,Son,10, Scholar,born Scotland.
John Carswell,Son, 9,Scholar, born Scotland.
Margaret Carswell, 7,born Scotland.
Janet Carswell 6, born Scotland.
Jane Carswell 4,,born Butley Cheshire,
Thomas Carswell,3, born Butley,Cheshire.
Robert Carswell, 1 born Butley Cheshire.
James Moner,Servant,Unmarried, 29,Farm Lab. born Scotland.
Thomas McDermed Serv,unmarried, born Scotland.
John Topping,serv, widower,60, born Poulton Lancs.
Peter Querk,Serv,Unmarried,25,Farm Lab. born Ireland.
Helen Mc Nab, Serv. unmarried, 19, House servant, born Scotland.
Jane Gillies, Servant, unmarried, 24, House servant, born Scotland.

1861 Census Butley Prestbury.Allan Carswell ,Enumerator.
Parkhouse .
Allan Carswell Head, 47, Farmer of 177 acres employing 6 labourers & one boy, born Scotland.
Jean Carswell, Wife, 45, House Keeper & wife,born Scotland.
Allan Carswell, Son, Unm, 20, Ploughman, born Scotland.
John Carswell, Son, Unm, 19, Ploughman, born Scotland.
Margaret Carswell, Daug, Unm, 17,Dairymaid, born Scotland.
Janet Carswell,Daug, Unm, 16, Assistant, born Scotland.
Jane Carswell, Daug, Unm, 14, Scholar, born Butley Prestbury Cheshire.
Thomas Carswell, Son, 13, Scholar, Born Butley.
Robert Carswell, Son, 11, Scholar, born Butley.
William Carswell, Son, 8, Scholar, born Butley.
Agnes Carswell, Daug, 7, Scholar, born Butley.

1871 Census. Allan Carswell Jun, Enumerator.
Parkhouse.
Allan Carswell Head, Mar, 57, Farmer & Land Agent .177 acres employing 5 labourers born Scotland.
Jean Carswell, Wife, Mar, 55, born Scotland.
Allan Carswell, Son, Unmarried, 30 Farmers son, born Scotland.
Margaret Carswell, Daug, unmarr. 27, Farmers daughter, born Scotland.
Jane Carswell, Daug, 24, Farmers Daughter, born Butley.
Thomas Carswell, Son, Unmarr, 23, Highway Surveyor 40 Townships, Born Butley.
Robert Carswell, Son, Unmarr. Farmers Son, born Butley.
Agnes Carswell, Daug, Unmarr, 19, Farmers Daughter ,born Butley.
Mathew Touher, Servant, Unmar, 19, Farm Servant Indoor, born Ireland.

Dwelling: Red Brook Farm Census Place: Adlington, Cheshire, England 1881. Source: FHL Film 1341835 PRO Ref RG11 Piece 3487 Folio 29 Page 11 Marr Age Sex Birthplace Jean CARSWELL W 65 F Scotland Rel: Head Occ: Farmer (78 Acres Employing 1 Lab) Margaret CARSWELL U 37 F Scotland Rel: Daur Jane MOTTERSHEAD W 34 F Prestbury, Cheshire, England Rel: Daur Robert CARSWELL U 31 M Prestbury, Cheshire, England Rel: Son Occ: Farmers Son Employed At Home William CARSWELL U 28 M Prestbury, Cheshire, England Rel: Son Occ: Land Agent (Ho) Agnes CARSWELL U 27 F Prestbury, Cheshire, England Rel: Daur George H. C. MOTTERSHEAD 2 M Cheadle, Cheshire, England Rel: Grand Son

"Allan Carswell Factor Adlington Hall Cheshire " Mentioned in Thomas Carswell of Neilstonside.( 1879-1798) Will
Allan died as the result of a shooting accident at Redbrook Adlington .See newspaper articles re coroners inquest ect.

Possibly Allan Carswell? Pig breeder.
Southport and Ormskirk
Agricultural show
Southport Visiter, 19th Aug 1858
Southport and Ormskirk Agricultural Show
The show was on ground belonging to the East Lancashire Railway, the now unused station set apart for the flowers and vegetables, the ground beyond for stock, poultry and implements.
Upwards of 6,000 people arrived by railway.

PIGS
Best boar, large breed
John HARRISON Jnr of Heaton Norris, Stockport, bred by CARSWELL, 1st
Thomas AINSCLOUGH, Scarisbrick, 2nd
Best boar small breed
J. HARRISON Jnr of Heaton Norris, Stockport, bred by exhibitor, 1st

1863- Appointed first surveyor of the Prestbury Hwy Board.Son Thomas took over in 1868 or 1869.
1868 or 1869 - Appointed estate agent to CRB Legh of Adlington Hall.
? to 1878 - Surveyor for the Sandon Raod Trustees.
In 1879 - Still on Prestbury Highway Board.
Oldest consecitive member of Baselaw ? o gardian of the Maclesfield Union & member of Assessment Commitee.

Macclesfield Courier & Herald. Saturday November 15th 1879.

The Late Gun Accident at Adlington . The Death of Mr Carswell.

As was greatly feared from the first, the gun accident which took place at Adlington last Tuesday , resulting in serious injuries to Mr. Carswell, the much respected estate agent to CRB Legh. of Adlington Hall, has ended fatally. Mr Carswell was a man of iron constitution, & a faint hope was entertained , especially after his recovery of speech & consciousness that he might be able to battle with the consequences of the brain injury he had sustained. Several erroneous statements as to how the accident happened have appeared in print , & of course as no one but the deceased actually knew how it occurred , & he was never able to give particulars , something is left to conjecture. There can be no doubt ,however , that in getting through the hedge something accidentally caught the trigger of the gun & caused the hammer to fall , & as the muzzle pointed upwards, part of the contents of the gun caught the side of the head above the ear & caused fracture of the skull & injury to the top part of the brain . On Friday night unfavourable reactionary symptoms presented themselves , & it was seen that medical skill would be of no avail. The sufferer continued in a semi-conscious state until about eight o’clock on Saturday morning , when death took place.

The news was received in Macclesfield & everywhere in the district where it became known. , with very grate regret & expressions of sympathy for the family & respect for the deceased , who was well known for his sturdy straightforwardness & for his deep interest in all that concerned farming & agricultural pursuits , highway & poor-law administration , & the general well being of the neighbourhood. Mr. Carswell was a good type of shrewd, hard-headed & thoroughly practical Scotchman; a man whose opinion was of value , who during many years past had successfully devoted himself to the improvement of the Adlington Estate, & who has left behind him sons well qualified to perpetuate their fathers good qualities.

On the formation of the Prestbury Highway Board, in 1863, under the new Highway Act , Mr. Carswell was appointed the first surveyor. It fell to his lot therefore , to consolidate the work of the district , & those gentlemen who from the first have been connected with the Board know how thoroughly & economically he succeeded in this.

Always eminently practical , he was studiously honest & impartial in the discharge of his duties. He retained the office up to 1868 or 1869, when on his appointment of estate agent to C.R.B. Legh,Esq., he was succeeded by his son Mr. Thomas Carswell, who had the benefit of good training under his father.

Mr. Carswell was also surveyor for the Sandon Road Trustees, which office he retained with credit to himself & signal success to the trust , until the dissolution of that body a year ago, under the recent act of Parliament. He was also one of the oldest , if not the oldest consecutive baselaw? O Guardian to the Macclesfield Union ,an able member of the Assessment Committee ( of which readers of the Courier are well aware) - a member of the Prestbury Highway Board , & an active & useful man in all departments of parochial business.




The Inquest.
Though it was but all too well known that Mr. Carswell met his death accidentally, the law is such that an inquest had to be held. The inquiry took place on Monday afternoon at the Unicorn Inn ( Mr. Athertons’s) before Mr. Garside, coroner, Mr. James Dalzeil, an old & intimate friend of the deceased, being foreman of the jury, by every one of whom Mr. Carswell was well known & respected.

Mr. Robert Carswell was the first witness called . He said “Deceased was my father , & he was 65 years of age last
March . I lived with him at Redbrook farm . On Tuesday last , November 4th , my father rose in his usual health &
spirits about eight o’clock . At breakfast time he said that there were some rabbits in the garden,

& he would go & shoot them. About nine or ten o’clock he went out of the house with his gun over his shoulder,
& soon after I heard some shots as if he were shooting at the rabbits. A few minutes afterwards I was in the stable
charging my gun , & I saw my father in a corner doing the same. I went up to him to see whether he would want his horse & trap that morning , as he usually went to Macclesfield on Tuesday. He afterwards went out of the stable & into the field through a hole in the hedge.” In answer to the coroner , witness said the gun in question was a pin fire breech loader. Continuing he said “The first I heard of anything being wrong was as I was walking by the side of the building , I heard the report of a gun; this was about 5 minutes after my father left me in the stable. Having heard the report ,I went straight to the gate , to see what was the matter , & saw my father lying on his right side near to the hedge , about 30 yards or more from the gate. I went up to him & noticed that the gun was lying by his side , the stock being under his left foot , & the muzzle pointing towards his head. He said “Bob, the gun has gone off & shot me.” I tried to get him up , but found I could not manage it , so I ran into the house for assistance , & with help thus obtained , succeeded in getting deceased into the house .As we were carrying him in , he told me to go & fetch Mr. Hughes. I immediately dispatched a messenger & then went with the horse & trap for my brother. On returning I found my father on the sofa , & attended by Mr. Hughes, who in conjunction with Dr. Wise , of Poynton , continued to attend him till his death on Saturday morning. Mr. Hughes was with him when he died.”

In answer to the coroner, witness said “My father has been used to shooting for a great number of
years , & several years back he had one of his fingers shot clean away , & another nearly so , from an explosion of a muzzle-loading gun which he was charging.”

The Foreman- “Was your father going to Macclesfield that day to attend the Board of Guardians?”
Witness. “He was”
The Forman “Then that was your object in asking him whether he would require the trap?”
Witness. “Yes, that was my object.”

It was mentioned by one or two of the jurymen that some of the members of the deceased’s family had been heard to say that Mr. Carswell , in one of his moments of consciousness said that the trigger of the gun caught on a twig as he was going through the hedge.

Mr. James B. Hughes, surgeon ,next deposed- “ I have known the deceased about 12 years , in his capacity as agent to C.R.B. Legh, Esq ., & for the last 5 years have prescribed for him & his family. On Tuesday morning , about a quarter to eleven, a messenger came to tell me of the accident , & in consequence thereof I went to Adlington. When I arrived at the deceased’s house I found him lying on the sofa in the breakfast room , perfectly insensible. I in conjunction with Dr. Wise , examined his head , & found a large jagged scalp wound , in the centre of which was a round hole penetrating to the skull, about the size of a shilling . His collar , shirt front & coat were covered with blood . We removed the broken pieces of bone & I remained with him till about 7 o’clock that night & returned again at seven o’clock the next morning. I continued to attend him till the Saturday , when he died. During the whole of Tuesday deceased was utterly unconscious , & continued so nearly all day on Wednesday except once , when , as I was touching the wound , he cried out, “Oh, give over”. In my opinion , none of the pellets entered the skull, but glanced off as soon as they struck his head. I should not like to say that none entered , but as far as I can judge they did not. Deceased died about eight o’clock on Saturday morning & the cause of death was inflammation of membrane of the brain ,resulting from a gun shot wound .”

On recommendation of the Coroner , a verdict was found to the effect that death resulted from a gun shot wound received whilst out rabbit shooting.

The Foreman said he did not think they ought to separate without signifying their sympathy with the bereaved family . He thought they all knew the deceased , & he was sure that all whom did would agree that a more honest , straightforward, & business-like man never lived ; he should propose that a vote of condolence be passed with the deceased family in their great trouble. The resolution was unanimously agreed to. The Coroner said he thoroughly endorsed what Mr. Dalzeil had said ; he had known deceased personally for a number of years , both as land agent to C.R.B.Legh,Esq & also as a member of the Board of Guardians. In fact he was one of his most intimate friends. He was very glad that the jury had thought fit to pass the vote of condolence.


The Funeral.

The remains of the deceased gentleman were interred in the family grave in Prestbury Churchyard on Wednesday., amid every proper token of respect for the departed & sympathy for the bereaved. The day was bright but bitterly cold , &, so far as the family were concerned , the funeral was a private one ,it was under the circumstances , one of the largest & most representative funerals we have seen in the district for some time. Mr. Legh of Adlington Hall , who was at Scarborough when the sad accident occurred , followed the remains in his private carriage . & at the funeral ceremony , by his own special request , appeared as one of the chief mourners. There were also present gentlemen from every part of the county. Macclesfield being largely represented by several of the local magistracy, members of the Town Council, Board of Guardians, & several inhabitants to whom the deceased were well known. There were also several country members of the Board of Guardians & Pressure Highway Board present , as well as friends from Wilmslow, Chorley, Poynton, Old Withington, Siddington , Macclesfield Forest, & the surrounding townships, with the tenantry & employees on the Adlington estate.

The funeral procession started from Redbrook , deceased residence, punctually at twelve o’clock . It consisted of five mourning coaches, occupied as follows; 1st ,Mr. Allan Carswell, Mr. Thomas Carswell, Mr. William Carswell,& Mr. Robert Carswell, deceased sons.2nd; Mr. John Carswell, Mr. W. Carswell,& Mr. Alexander Carswell, brothers, & Mr. Joseph Handforth, son in law;3rd,Mr John Craig, Mr. Allan Craig & Mr. McQue(cousins);4th, Mr. Hughes & Mr. Gardiner ,surgeons,& Mr. Richard Stanhope; the fifth coach containing the bearers. The coaches were followed by the private carriages of Mr. Legh, Mr. Holroyd, of Starky House, Adlington, & the deputation carriage of the Prestbury Highway Board , by Mr. Needham (chairman), Mr. Devenport (vice-chairman) & Mr. JF May (clerk). Following these were the carriages of several private friends from Macclesfield & district. On arriving near the railway bridge at Prestbury the CORTEGE was augmented by a large number of friends who preceded the hearse to the churchyard, & opened out right & left while the coffin was born into the Church, which was well filled by a respectful & devout congregation. The service was impressively read by the Rev. Canon Wilson, Vicar of Prestbury, both in the Church & at the grave , around which sorrowing friends lingered.

The coffin, on which several beautiful wreaths were placed ,was of polished oak, with massive brass fittings , the plate bearing the simple inscription :-
ALLAN CARSWELL,
DIED NOVEMBER 8th ,1879.
AGED 65 YEARS.
The funeral arrangements were carried out by Mr. Swanwick, Market-place , Macclesfield, in his usual punctual & faultless style.

















Board of Guardians Meeting.

At the meeting of the Board of Guardians on Tuesday last , the presiding Chairman (Mr.A. Horden) made timely allusion to the painful event . He said “We have known Mr. Carswell many years & the lamentable occurrence which has taken place ,will be generally regarded as a most deplorable one. Mr. Carswell has been a Guardian for very many years; he was elected in April, 1855 & appointed on the Assessment Committee in April ,1865. You, gentlemen , have always admired the straightforward, honest ,& impartial manner in which he has taken part in the discussions & business of this Board. It is unnecessary that I should speak of his merits - they are well known to all of you. My object in risings to request the Law Clerk to write a letter of condolence to his family, expressing our regret at the bereavement they have sustained.”

Mr. Carr seconded the vote of condolence. He said -“I am pretty nearly one of the oldest elected Guardians at this Board , having been elected nearly 30 years ago, & I knew the character of Mr. Carswell from his first coming to this country. Like every gentleman present , I deeply deplore the accident which has terminated a most valuable life. I don’t know any man whose character & standing as a public man was higher, & who had a greater desire to do all that is just , right & equitable. He brought to bear a great amount of knowledge , not only at this Board ,but in other matters connecting with the Union. I deeply deplore his loss , & I am sure his death will be felt , not only at this Board , but throughout the Union. His death comes with sad significance . We meet & we go away , & don’t know that we shall meet again. I never remember a death which has produced a deeper feeling of sorrow & oppression, the circumstances being of a most lamentable character. He was a gentleman we were pleased to see at the Board. With great geniality of countenance & temper, with a desire at all times to do his duty most conscientiously , & the advice he gave at all times was of a most valuable character. . When sent on deputations to the Government or elsewhere he acquitted himself well; he represented the Board in his own character, & anything I can say respecting him would fall short of reality. I will only that I feel deeply the great loss this Board has sustained , as well as the great loss his wife & family has sustained. I second the vote of condolence which you have asked Mr. May to convey to them. No one has been more intimately connected with Mr. Carswell than Mr. May. I have no doubt the feeling of this Board will be conveyed by him to the family in most telling language.” The vote was then unanimously passed , & the chairman invited the members of the Board to accompany him to the funeral on the following day.

Mr. May wished to say a word expressive of his official & personal sympathy at the loss which the Board & the public in the district had sustained. “ I have (he said) known Mr. Carswell for a long time period ,ever since in fact he came into this part of the country, now thirty-four or thirty-five years ago. For a long period he has been a Guardian , & I have known him as one of the most intelligent . He has witnessed many important alterations of the law , & in all these legislative interferences , he has always been a prominent member , who has taken the initiative in attending to the wants & interests of this Union. In the office of way warden which he has also filled , he has taken a similarly useful part, & his straightforward manner , his clear intelligence , & the capacity for business have always been confided in by his fellow members of the Board. His upright character & high principal were recognized by all , & he attained a position in this district such as few men can hope to attain by having connected himself with various public duties . We all think Mr. Carswell has been a most worthy citizen ; he has performed all his duties in a most admiral manner, & though on some occasions he was very brusque & energetic in the mode in which he expressed his feelings , every one knew they were honestly expressed & that there was nothing underneath the surface. I shall convey with great sympathy the wishes of the Board in the form in which they can best be conveyed to his bereaved widow & family.” The Board then rose.

Letter of Condolence.

The following is a copy of the resolution conveyed by Mr. May to the family of the late Mr. Carswell from the Board of Guardians:-“ That the Clerk convey to Mrs. Carswell, of Adlington , an expression of the deep & heartfelt sympathy of every member of this Board for her & her family in the lamented death of her husband. Such a bereavement could not be otherwise than universally felt in a district where Mr. Carswell has for a quarter of a century been actively & usefully engaged ,both as a member of this Board & in other public offices ,




& where his natural & acquired talents were eminently conspicuous . Clear-sited, intelligent, & energetic , possessing high sense of honour & sound & discriminating judgement, his support was consistently given to everything tending to improved local administration , or more a equitable distribution of burdens ; his practical mind & ripe experience rendered his council & opinion of exceptional weight & value,& his constancy as a public servant was most exemplary. Few men made so many cordial & warm hearted friends, & none could be more esteemed , cherished, & regarded in public life. The members of the Board feel it their melancholy duty to place on record their sense of public loss , & their sincere condolence with Mrs. Carswell & family in their deep affliction.”


Macclesfield Courier & Herald .Saturday . November 15th 1879.

Prestbury Highway Board. The Late Mr. Carswell.

Before the business of the Board was commenced the CHAIRMAN said he should like to make a few remarks in reference to the great loss the Board had sustained by the death of Mr. Carswell, of Adlington, one of the oldest & most practical members of the Board. The circumstances of his death they were all acquainted with - it was a very melancholy & sad affair, & knowing him intimately as he had done for many years, it gave him great pain of mind to refer to the unfortunate occurrence. They were no doubt all aware Mr. Carswell had been connected with the Board since its formation in 1863, upwards of 16 years. For the first six years of its existence Mr. Carswell was surveyor, & for the remaining 10 he had been one of its best & most respected & useful members. He (the chairman) had been a member of the Board since its formation, & had therefore been in a position of seeing how Mr. Carswell had discharged his duties in both capacities, & he could safely say that a more straightforward, disinterested, & honourable man never sat on that or any Board. He thought it was their duty as a Board to express their feelings of regret & sorrow at the occurrence, & sympathy with the widow & family in their heavy bereavement, (Hear Hear.)He was sure he expressed the feelings of every one present - they would excuse him if he did not say much more, for he had known Mr. Carswell so long & so intimately that he did not feel as if he could - when he proposed that the clerk be instructed to convey to Mrs. Carswell & family the deep sense of loss they had sustained, in their affliction. (Hear, Hear.)

The VICE-CHAIRMAN seconded. He had known Mr. Carswell perhaps longer than anyone present - he knew him when he first came to reside in the neighbourhood, between 30 & 40 years ago , had had many transactions in business, connected with the board & otherwise , & he fully endorsed all that the chairman had said. (hear, hear).

The proposition, we need hardly say was passed unanimously .

The Chairman then intimated that he intended being present at the funeral on Wednesday to pay his last respects to their departed friend, adding that he would be pleased to see as many members of the Board as could conveniently attend. 
Carswell, Allan (I37)
 
81 1841 Census has Alexander age 20 living with cousin William Carswell at the' Craig of Neilston.'

1861 Census Neilston.
Kirkton Farm. Alexander Carswell Head Unmarried 38 Farmer of 83 Acres employing 2 labourers . born Neilston.

ALEXANDER CARSWELL International Genealogical Index Gender: Male Marriage: 18 JUN 1861 Mearns, Renfrew, Scotland

Father: Alexander Carswell, Mother: Margaret Gilmour
-

International Genealogical Index - British Isles
1. ALLAN GILMOUR CARSWELGender: Male Birth: 20 FEB 1871 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
2. ELIZABETH CARSWELL Birth: 29 JAN 1863 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
3. WILLIAM CRAIG CARSWELL : Male Birth: 22 MAY 1867 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
4. JAMES CARSWELL r: Male Birth: 19 JUN 1861 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
5. JANET CARSWELL: Female Birth: 25 OCT 1864 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
6. ALEXANDER CARSWELL: Male Birth: 27 MAY 1868 Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland

Kirkton Farm. 1871 Census
Alexander Carswell ,Head,Married ,50, Farmer of 80 acres employing 2 men & 2 ploughmen, born Neilston.
Margaret Carswell , Wife, Married, 37, born Neilston.
James Carswell , Son, Scholar 9 ,born Neilston.
Elizabeth Carswell, Daug. Scholar, 8, born Neilston.
Jessie Carswell, Daug, Scholar, 6, born Neilston.
William Carswell, Son, 4, born Neilston.
Alexander Carswell, Son, 2, born Neilston.
Allan Carswell , Son, 1 Month, born Neilston.
John Rider , Servant , Un Married, 21, Ploughman, born Ireland.
Phillip Lynch,Servant, Un Married, 15, Ag Labourer, born Neilston.
Sarah Rider,Servant, 24, General Servant, born Ireland.
Hilda ? Rider, Servant, unmarried, 14, General Servant, born Ireland.

1881 Census
Dwelling: Kirkton Farm
Census Place: Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Source: FHL Film 0203579 GRO Ref Volume 572-1 EnumDist 9 Page 50
Marr Age Sex Birthplace
Alex. CARSWELL M 60 M Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Head
Occ: Farmer (80 Imp Acres)
Jessie CARSWELL U 17 F Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Daur
Occ: Farmers Daughter
William C. CARSWELL U 13 M Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Son
Occ: Farmers Son
Elizabeth LOVE U 26 F Cadder, Lanark, Scotland
Rel: Serv
Occ: Dairymaid
John MC INTYRE U 17 M Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Serv
Occ: Farm Servant
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Dwelling: Glanderston Farm
Census Place: Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Source: FHL Film 0203579 GRO Ref Volume 572-1 EnumDist 9 Page 52
Marr Age Sex Birthplace
Margt. CARSWELL M 40 F Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Head
Occ: Farmers Wife 75 Imperial Acres
Elizabeth CARSWELL U 18 F Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Daur
Occ: Farmers Daughter
James CARSWELL U 19 M Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Son
Occ: Farmers Son
Alexander CARSWELL U 12 M Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Son
Occ: Scholar
Allan G. CARSWELL U 9 M Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Son
Occ: Scholar
Jane CHRISTIE U 22 F New Kilpatrick Maryhill
Rel: Servant
Occ: Dairymaid

Carswell Alexander 31/1/1901 Farmer, Kirkton, Neilston, d. 29/11/1900 at Kirkton aforesaid, testate Paisley Sheriff Court From www.scottishdocuments.com.au 
Carswell, Alexander (I791)
 
82 1841 Census has James aged 9 living at Craig of Neilston with his brother Alexander aged 20 . William Carswell age 45 was head of family. Carswell, James (I797)
 
83 1841 Census Neilston.
Barrhead, John McKay 45 Carter not born Renfrewshire.
Mrs McKay, 45, not born Renfrew.
John 20, Carter Not born Renfrew.
Will 13,Carter, born Renfrew.
Jean, 11, born Renfrew.
Alex,7, born Renfrew.
Alex Caldwell,26,Carter ,born Renfrewshire.


Had various addresses in Ayrshire before settling in Barrhead. 
McKay, John (I683)
 
84 1841 Census,
John Carswell,31,Ag Lab, Sexton, born in Renfrewshire.
Margaret Carswell, 30, born in Renfrewshire.
Agnes,8,George,4,Janet 2,
Janet Gemmell ,50, Reeler, born Renfrew.
Alex Gemmell,13.born Renfrew.

1841 Census .Piece: SCT1841/572 Place: Neilston-Renfrewshire Enumeration District: 7 Civil Parish: Neilston Ecclesiastical Parish, Village or Island: - Folio: 9 Page: 17 Address: Neilston Village Surname First name(s) Sex Age Occupation Where Born Remarks
CARSWELL John M 31 ,Ag Labourer ,Sexton Renfrewshire Page: 9/18
CARSWELL Margt F 30 Renfrewshire
CARSWELL Agnes F 8 Renfrewshire
CARSWELL Geo M 4 Renfrewshire
CARSWELL Janet F 2 Renfrewshire
GEMILL Janet F 50 Reeler Renfrewshire
GEMILL Alexr M 13 Renfrewshire



"William Gemmell the childs grandfather was sponser."from Johns birth entry.

The History of Neilston Parish by Dr. Pride 1910
'Sometime gravedigger, minister's man, church officer,postman and registrar, was a type of man found in many old towns some fifty or sixty years ago. His family, by his maternal relatives by the name of Gemmell, had been church officers and gravediggers for over 700 years as proved by church records. John, or Johnny as he was known, was about 17 stone weight, and not by any manner a teetotaller. To a blustering manner he added a natural shrewdness and wit, a straight out and honourable man. He had been in contact with many ministers of most of the parishes around, through the occasional exchange of pulpits. On one occasion, when the minister of Neilston the Rev Dr Fleming was preaching at Eaglesham, he had his man Johnny with him as coachman. (about 8 miles away.) Johnny then went to the service with his brother beadle,and sat with him. The home beadle, as the sermon got well under way, offered his snuffbox to the visitor, which was gratefully accepted and returned after partaking of the snuff. The beadle also took a quantity and the pair sat back, satisfied. Dr Fleming, being a strict disciplinarian, stopped his sermon and glared at the pair. Leaning over the pulpit, he said 'Some of you are more interested in their noses than the salvation of your souls!' Needless to say, the beadle was more careful in his behaviour after such a criticism'

1851 Census Neilston.
John Carswell, Head, Church Officer, Married, 39, born Neilston.
Margaret carswell, Wife, 40, born Neilston.
Agnes Carswell, Daug, 18,born Neilston.
George Carswell, Son, 14,born Neil;ston.
Margaret Carswell , Daug. 8, born Neilston.
John Carswell, Son, 4,born Neilston.
Jannet Gemmell, Mother, Unmarr. 61, Cotton Reeler, born Neilston.
Alex Gemmell, Nephew, Unmarried, 23, Machine maker Apprentice, born Neilston.


1861 Census.Neilston.
John Carswell ,Head, Married, 49, Sexton & Letter carrier, born Neilston.
Margaret Carswell, Wife, 50, Sextons wife, born Neilston,
Agnes Carswell , Daug, Unmarried,28, Boot Binder,born Neilston.
Margaret Carswell, Daug,Unmarried, 18, Cotton Shirt Dresser, born Neilston.
John Carswell ,son ,14, Architect(Apprentice) ,born Neilston.
Janet Gemmell , Mother, 71, Unmarried, 71, Former Cotton Reeler. born Neilston.


1871 Census
Strangs Land Neilston John Carswell,Head, 59, Beadle & Registrar, born Neilston.
Margaret Carswell Wife ,60,born Neilston.
Agnes Carswell ,Daug,unmarried, 37, Seamstress. born Neilston.
Thomas Carswell, adopted son, 10, School, born, Ireland.
Janet Gemmell, Mother, Unmarried, 81, born Neilston.

John died 3.30 am Dec 16 1880 at Neilston aged 69 years.His death certificate stated that he was illigitimate & that his reputed father was John Carswell farmer, & mother Janet Gemmell deceased.He died from Apoplexy Paralysis as certified by Dr. David Pride.Informant was his daughter Margaret Creamer of Glehill Campsie.

He was still registar for Neilston in 1874. 
Carswell, John (I691)
 
85 1841 Census,
John Carswell,31,Ag Lab, Sexton, born in Renfrewshire.
Margaret Carswell, 30, born in Renfrewshire.
Agnes,8,George,4,Janet 2,
Janet Gemmell ,50, Reeler, born Renfrew.
Alex Gemmell,13.born Renfrew.

Living with his aunt Janet Gemmell in 1841

1881 Census
Dwelling: 23 Hutcheson St
Census Place: Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland
Source: FHL Film 0203653 GRO Ref Volume 644-7 EnumDist 33 Page 21
Marr Age Sex Birthplace
Alexander GEMMELL M 55 M Paisley, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Head
Occ: Assistant Surveyor
Elizabeth GEMMELL M 51 F Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland
Rel: Wife
Agnes T. GEMMELL U 23 F Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland
Rel: Dau
Occ: Dressmaker
Elizabeth A. GEMMELL U 21 F Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland
Rel: Dau
Occ: General Serv Dom
Jeannie R. GEMMELL U 19 F Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland
Rel: Dau
Occ: Machinist
Mary I. GEMMELL U 16 F Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland
Rel: Dau
Occ: Pupil Teacher
Jessie P. GEMMELL U 6 F Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland
Rel: Dau
Occ: Scholar 
Gemmell, Alexander (I1222)
 
86 1841 Census,
Craig of Neilston.William Carswell age 45,farmer ,born Renfrewshire.
Alexander Carswell 20, born Renfrew. 'Son of James C.& Janet Sproul'
James Carswell 9, born Renfrew. 'Son of James Carswell & Jean Andrew'.
William Smith, 35, Ag Lab. born Renfrew.
Agnes Kirkwood,30,Female Servant,born Renfrew.
Margaret Kirkwood,30, Female Servant,born Renfrew.
Thora Gillies,20,Servant, not born Renfrew.
Janet McInneinnies ,20, Ag Lab born Renfrewshire. 
Kirkwood, Agnes (I1226)
 
87 1841 Census.
Parkhouse, Robert Young ,60, Farmer , born Ren.
Elizabeth Young 60,
James Young 20.
Elizabeth Taylor 20, 
Young, Robert (I694)
 
88 1841 Census.Arthurlie
Surname First name(s) Sex Age Occupation Where Born Remarks
CRAIG Thomas M 30 Ag Lab Renfrewshire
CRAIG Jean F 25 Renfrewshire CRAIG Thomas M 5m Renfrewshire CARSWELL Margaret F 15 Female Servant Renfrewshire (daug of Allan C & Jean S) STEVENSON Janet F 9 Female Servant Renfrewshire (daug of Hugh S & Marg C?) 
Stevenson, Janet (I1207)
 
89 1841 Census.Piece: SCT1841/572 Place: Neilston-Renfrewshire Enumeration District: 3a Civil Parish: Neilston Ecclesiastical Parish, Village or Island: - Folio: 4 Page: 4 Address: West Arthurlie Surname First name(s) Sex Age Occupation Where Born Remarks
CRAIG Thomas M 30 Ag Lab Renfrewshire
CRAIG Jean F 25 Renfrewshire
CRAIG Thomas M 5m Renfrewshire
CARSWELL Margaret F 15 Female Servant Renfrewshire
STEVENSON Janet F 9 Female Servant Renfrewshire . Possibly Margaret living with the Craigs in 1841.

1851Census has Margaret living with her mother & brother William at Woodneuk Farm Neilston .

Woodneuk Farm . Mrs Jane Carswell, Head, Wid, age 58? , Holdy ? Farm of 50 acres. b. Neilston.
William Carswell , Son, unmarried, 26,
Margaret Carswell , Daug. unmarried, 24.
Catherine McLeod, Serv. ,unmarried,,16. House servant.
Archibald Gilliy? Visitor,unmarried 30, Ag. Lab.


'14-12-1852- John McKay Carter crop Arthurlie and Margaret Carswell Of Barrhead both of this Parish were booked for proclamation of banns the 11th December and being regularly proclaimed and no objection offered were married at Barrhead 14th dat of December 1852 by Rev.Hugh Aird Minister of Neilston.

"Margaret Carswell or McKay Widow of the late John McKay Farmer in Barrhead." Mentioned in Thomas Carswell ( 1798-1879) of Neilstonside's Will.
1881 Census.
Dwelling: Cross Arthurlie Farm
Census Place: Neilston, Renfrew, Scotland
Source: FHL Film 0203580 GRO Ref Volume 572-2 EnumDist 7 Page 36
Marr Age Sex Birthplace
Margaret MC KAY W 56 F Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Head
Occ: Farmer About 200 Acres Arable 6 Men 2 Girls 1 Boy
John MC KAY U 26 M Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Son
Occ: Ham Curer
Allan MC KAY U 24 M Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Son
Occ: Farmers Son
Jessie MC KAY U 22 F Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Daur
Occ: Farmers Daughter
Robert MC KAY U 20 M Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Son
Occ: Apprentice Law Clerk
William MC KAY U 18 M Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Son
Occ: Grain Merchant
Alexander MC KAY U 14 M Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Son
Occ: Scholar
David CUMMINGS U 72 M Barrhead, Renfrew, Scotland
Rel: Serv
Occ: Agricultural Labourer

Written by Johan:-
My name is Margaret Jane Carswell, I was born on 15 January 1826, at Loanfoot, Neilston, Renfrewshire. I had four older brothers and two older sisters. Before long I had two younger brothers and a wee sister too. I don’t have many recollections of living at Loanfoot. It wasn’t a big farmhouse, and with a big family to look after my father took over the tenancy of another farm, Thorterburn. It was still in Neilston, but it was nestled way up in the Fereneze Braes. We moved there about 1829. My wee sister, Janet was born there on 21 February of that year, then my brother Thomas was born in 1831 and in July of 1833 my youngest brother, Alexander, or Sandy as we called him, was born. At the very end of December in that year, when I was only seven years old my father died, how awful that was. It was just as well my mother was from farming stock, and could take over the running of the farm, otherwise I don’t know what would have happened to us. And we were lucky that my oldest brother, Allan was nearly twenty and could share the burden of running the farm with my mother. In fact, all my older brothers and sisters did their share at that time.
Tragedy struck again on 7 February 1836 when wee Janet died, just before her seventh birthday. In many ways we were fortunate that the rest of us enjoyed good health. I don’t really remember the funeral, but I am sure it would have been in the parish church, and all my aunts and uncles would have been there. There’s a family lair there, and a headstone with my Granny and Grandfather Carswell’s name on it. I see it every time I go to the church. They died when I was just an infant, and I don’t remember my Granny or Grandfather Stevenson either. They had lived out at Caldwell in a farm called Auldbarn. My Uncle Allan Stevenson farmed there when I was growing up. Exactly a month after Janet’s death, my Uncle James died. He was a Spirit Dealer in Neilston, but he died out at my Uncle Robert’s farm at Craighall. Some of my cousins were left without mother or father when he died. He had a second wife, but she couldn’t look after all the family. I remember some of them went up to the Craig to live with the uncles. That was where my father had been born, and the family had been there for a long time. It was a fine farm, situated just at the foot of the Neilston Pad. I always liked going there to visit. When I climbed to the top of the Pad I thought I could see the whole world. I had a lot of aunts and uncles, and quite a few cousins too. My uncle Alexander went away to Australia, and we never heard from him again. My aunt Agnes moved away to a farm in Ayrshire, but the rest were around Neilston when I was young. In fact my Aunt Margaret had married Hugh Stevenson, who was my Mother’s brother, so the families were always very close.
A few years passed and the first wedding in the family took place. In 1838 Jean, my oldest sister married Tomas Craig. He was a farmer at West Arthurlie. I liked that farm, it sat right on the main road. The road we called the Low Road to Neilston. The next year, Allan married Jean Gemmell, a farmer’s daughter from Commore, up by the dam on the road to Dunlop. I was getting big and strong by then.. None of us had much schooling, but we could all read and write and worked hard. When Allan married he took over the tenancy of Thorterburn, and we moved to Woodneuk. Now that was a nice place. Nearer Barrhead, you went up Gateside Road, on up Hillside Road and the farm sat right on the Braes. For a while my brother William stayed on to work with Allan at Thorterburn, and my cousin Janet, Uncle James’s daughter worked there too. When I was fifteen Jean had her first baby, a boy called Thomas. I went to help out at West Arthurlie. I did a lot of outside work on the farm, but helped with the baby as well. My wee cousin Janet Stevenson, came to work there too. She was one of Uncle Hugh and Aunt Margaret’s daughters. She was only nine then, so mainly did the housework. My mother got on fine at Woodneuk She had Agnes, or Nannie, as we called my other sister, John, Robert, and even Thomas and Sandy to help out. Things were alright for us, there was never much money, but we were a lot better off than many others at that time. But Allan saw an opportunity to better himself. He was offered a position away down in Cheshire, in England. It was on a big estate south of Manchester. It was called Lyme Park and was owned by a family who went by the name of Leigh. He gave up the tenancy at Thorterburn and off he went with his young family. I missed him and so did our mother, but that was only the start. He got on well there, and could see how you could prosper in farming there. It wasn’t long before he had my next oldest brother, John inspired to follow him south. John was married to another Stevenson girl, Margaret, and they went south to Cannock in Staffordshire where they farmed for many years. And it wasn’t long before Margaret’s father, mother and family followed.
The next big event was when Nannie married. She was twenty eight when she married John Young. He was a young widower with children, but frankly I was beginning to wonder if Nannie would ever marry. She moved in to his farm at Parkhouse. It is on the outskirts of Barrhead, towards Househillwood. They had a big family, nine boys and a girl, not counting the children from James’s first marriage. Their first born were twins. I hadn’t known of any other twins in the family, and I was tickled with my two baby nephews. As my brothers got older, William went into the business as a butcher/ flesher along with young Sandy. Robert was a grocer, and sadly Thomas died before his twentieth birthday. My mother and I stayed on at Woodneuk, but had to employ a couple of farm hands, to do the heaviest of the work. I had my twenty first birthday there, my mother gave me a set of silver spoons, engraved with my initials. They have become very precious to me. If you always keep a little piece of silver, you will never want.
By 1851 I had met a young man, not a local, but he was doing well for himself, and seemed hard working. His name was John McKay, he was born in Ayrshire, but his father was a Highlander, his mother was from Ayrshire but they had settled eventually in Barrhead when John was quite young.
On 15th March of that year there was a terrible disaster in the area. There was a massive explosion deep within the workings of the Victoria Pit. I was so worried when I heard the news. John had a coal carting business at Tower Raiss, and they were back and forth to the pit carrying coal. He had a good business, employing 14 men, and luckily none of them were involved in the accident. But a lot of men lost their lives.
I don’t know if it was the thought of what might have been, or that he was now over thirty years old, and time he had a wife. You never could tell with him, he had a lot of the dour highlander in him. Whatever, we were married in December 1852. He had taken tenancy of the farm at Cross Arthurlie, it wasn’t much, only 18 acres, not a great deal of land, but it was a start for him. We had seven children, at fairly regular intervals, I have to say. My own mother moved out of Woodneuk and went to live with Robert, who wasn’t yet married then
My mother had a lot to contend with, One night in June of 1853 my youngest brother got himself into terrible bother. He was living in Main Street at the butchers shop with William. He was only nineteen years old. It was a Monday night, he had been up at Broom, at the Mearns and returned to Barrhead about eleven at night. He said that he was trotting along the street, when Andrew Easdon, whom he knew by sight came out of Wilson's public house, and struck his horse on the face with his bonnet. The horse was a young animal and started back. He ran at the horse again and tried to get my brother off and fight with him. My brother got past him at last and rode home. He put the horse into the stable and went into the house. He was going to bed when he heard a noise in the street. He opened the door to see what it was. He saw Easdon and another man rolling about on the road as if they were drunk. A man who was passing lifted up Easdon twice, but he fell down again each time, as if unable to stand. He said he was just looking at them and was joined by William Garroway, the baker from next door, and my other brother, William. The two men rolled to about the middle of the street. Garroway said to them that the best way to send them home would be to give them a good beating. Easdon looked up and asked if he thought he could do it. Garroway said he thought he could, upon which Easdon jumped up and rushed at him. Garroway stepped back and Easdon ran at Sandy, and struck him with his fist on the side of the head. He, of course, retaliated and struck him about the face. He came against Sandy again, this time with his head and tried to throw him over his head. Sandy gave him another blow which knocked him down, and he went into the house leaving him there. That was his story, and he assured everyone that he did not kick Easdon. That was bad enough to upset our mother, but the next day, tragically Easdon died. My brother was initially accused of murder. How awful it would have been if he had been found guilty. I am sure he would have been hanged. None of us would ever have gotten over it. He was the youngest of the family. Our father had died when he was only a few months old, so he never had a father’s discipline, but he would never have killed anyone. I was pregnant with Jane at the time, it was such a worry, it’s no wonder she wasn’t strong. Anyway, when the case went to court, the judge cleared Sandy of the charge, he was a very lucky boy indeed.
William got married to Margaret Mitchell in 1853, and for a while things went quite smoothly. One of John’s brothers, Alexander married and emigrated to America with his wife. John’s older brother, Gabriel, had been a soldier. He married a Catherine McFarlane from Stirlingshire when he was quite young. They have travelled about quite a lot. He worked in the Railway for a while, and then before he died suddenly in 1859, he ran his own carting business in Glasgow. He did a lot of work in connection with the canal that was being built in Glasgow at that time. He died in November, just months after his younger son, Gabriel, was born. I felt so sorry for my sister in law - lost her husband, new baby to look after, and her oldest daughter had just emigrated to the other side of the world the year previous. Agnes was just eighteen year old when she left this country, never to return. I remember at the time, it was Janet, the oldest daughter left at home, who took on the burdens of the family for a while. Janet married a freen’ of ours, Robert Carswell, he was another Carswell from Neilston. They settled in Barrhead, eventually. She died and Robert married again. They are a nice family, and are living in one of our houses in Carlibar Road now.
My brother Sandy had settled down a bit after his ordeal. He married Elizabeth Purdon in 1859. They had a big family, growing up with our children and William’s children. The cousins were all quite close, and we always kept in touch with the family in England. As their children got older, they were often sent up to see their Granny in Barrhead.
My sister Jean took ill and died in 1861, her youngest was only 4 years old. The boys all went into the drapery business, and ended up south of the border. The girls all stayed at home and were a great comfort to their father in his old age. They had spent most of their married life in Beith, but latterly before he died, Thomas was Baron Officer for Mure of Caldwell. Janet his daughter was a teacher at the Madras School in Neilston, she was a bright girl, and had received good schooling herself.
I could never understand the desire people had to travel. My cousin William Stevenson, Aunt Margaret Carswell’s young son left Scotland, bound for New Zealand, on the Sir William Eyre in 1862. How I prayed my family would stay close to home, but it just did not turn out the way I hoped. William did very well in New Zealand. He eventually bought his own farm and called it Carswell. Some of his brothers had followed the clan to Cheshire and farmed there. Even Isabella, the youngest of the family settled south of the border and married John McQuie. He was a land steward in one of the big estates down in Cheshire, but also a Scot.
I was glad John was doing well in Barrhead, he was still farming, and running his contractor’s business, and had bought some land for property development. There was such a need for decent houses for all the families who were coming from all over to work in the mills. Some also came to work on the farms. It was a better life on the farms here than in the crofts in the highlands and islands. John built the property at 130 Cross Arthurlie Street, and another at 101 Carlibar Road. They were good houses and as it turned out provided me with a good income from the rents. As my boys got older, only Robert and Allan showed an interest in farming, the other loved animals, horses in particular, but also had their sights set on other occupations. John wanted to teacher and Alexander became a civil engineer. Jessie always helped in the house, she was a gentle girl, and did her share by collecting the rents for me. She loved clothes and the fashion of the time, and always took care of her appearance. I think we allowed her the life of a lady, she wasn’t cut out for hard work. I was very lucky that John had a good business head on him. Nannie wasn’t so fortunate. James Young was doing well in the dairy business at Parkhouse, and when one of his brother’s asked him to back him in business, he agreed. It wasn’t a good propsition. The business failed and James was left with the debt. He had to sell up, and there was nothing to start them off again here. With very good fortune, my cousin George who was called after a good friend of James’s had been left a few pounds by his namesake. The family used that money to take them to Canada for a fresh start. In the end they prospered and as far as I know the money was repaid to George. But Nannie was never back in Scotland. I had lost all my sisters.
In the early seventies our young Jane died. She was never strong, and passed away in March of ’71, when she was only seventeen years old. She had had bronchitis for about 3 months. Then she took a nose bleed, nothing would stop it. It bled and bled for days. We had the surgeon, Mr Mackinlay look at her, but there was nothing anyone could do. John’s health began to cause me some concern. Like all the rest of them, he liked the whisky a bit too much. He died in on 27 January 1876, he was only 55 years old, but had outlived Gabriel, by a good fifteen years, and his mother and father had also died before old age. There was maybe a weakness in the family. He must have known for a while that he was dying, as he had made his will and set his affairs in order. He left us in a good financial position. His estate being worth nearly two thousand pounds. My mother had been living with us since Robert got married. He was a strange one. Nearly fifty when he and our cousin Agnes Stevenson from Cannock in Staffordshire decided to get married. She was quite a bit younger than him, but being about forty, a bit old to start bearing his children. They didn’t get married in the parish church either. Went through to Renfrew and married in the United Presbyterian Church at Kirland Neuk. Maybe he already had the brain disease that killed him two years later.
As my mother got older she became more frail, but when she died in 1877 she was 88 years old. The family, that could, travelled home for the funeral. It was good to see everyone together, even although it was in sad circumstances. My mother was a Stevenson you know. Not that long ago a young writer, who had made a big name for himself came to Neilston to seek out his ancestors. He went by the name of Robert Louis Stevenson, but that wasn’t the name he was baptised you know. Apparently he was Robert Lewis Balfour Stevenson. He had traced his family back to Nether Carswell in the 17the century. My mother may have descended from that same family, as her father farmed at Auld Barn. Land that was owned my Mure of Caldwell, as was Nether Carswell. Young Stevenson was not like us. He was a sickly soul, and travelled the world as a struggling writer. How he afforded his lifestyle, I don’t know, but he had a few books published. I heard about his death a couple of years back. He died in Samoa in the South Pacific. He has become more reknowned since his death. More famous now than he was when he came to Neilston.
My mother’s family was just as extensive as the Carswells. She had nieces and nephews around Beith, Dalry, Lochwinnoch and Paisley. Some I knew, but there were so many that I am sure there were others I never knew. My cousin David, who was married to Grace Winning from Neilston headed for New Zealand around the same time as our cousin William went. They were even more adventurous, there whole family went, and as far as I know, all survived the journey. That cousin David was son of my mother’s brother, Andrew. Another cousin David and his brother, Robert, sons of her brother Allan, have a good bacon curing business up at Burnhouse.
Shortly after my mother died, I had a nice windfall. My Uncle Thomas Carswell from Wraes Mill died. He had married a farm servant, late in life, and left her well provided for. He also left a nice sum of money to me and some of the cousins. After providing for his wife, the remainder of his estate was divided between me, my brothers Allan and John in England, William and Sandy at home. Five Stevenson women, daughters of my late aunt Margaret Carswell, two Kirkwood women, dughters of my late Aunt Agnes, four Carswell girls, and Alexander, family of my late Uncle John. It was strange, some cousins like Hugh Stevenson who farmed in Islay got nothing. I suppose he had his reasons. I think my brother Sandy was lucky to be included, when he had gotten into debt he borrowed money from Uncle Thomas, and hadn’t been able to pay it back. He was in court more than once because of his inability to manage his financial affairs. Uncle Thomas probably always had a soft spot for him, just as he had for our cousin Alexander up at Kirkton.
Before Uncle Thomas’s bequests were finalised another terrible tragedy struck the family. My brother down in Cheshire was involved in a fatal shooting accident and died as a result. It was a November morning, and he had gone out to shoot rabbits in the land next to the house. He had fired some shots, and my nephew, Robert, had gone out to assist. He spoke briefly with his father who was setting off to go into the next field. Robert said that as he was in the stable, he heard a shot and looked out. He saw his father lying by the hedge. When he got to him, he was able to say that the gun had gone off and shot him. There was a hole in his skull about the size of a shilling. He was in and out of consciousness until the Saturday, but could not be saved. He died about eight o’clock on Saturday morning. As soon as word reached us, my brothers William and Sandy set off for Cheshire to attend the funeral. They told me all about it when they came home. Allan was a very well respected member of the community down there. Mr Leigh of Adlington Hall followed the remains in his private carriage, and at his own special request was one of the chief mourners. My brother John was there, and my sister Jean’s boys, John and Allan Craig were also able to attend - they were both drapers in Manchester, and John McQuie, Isabel Stevenson’s husband was there too, as well as Allan’s sons, of course. It was good that the family could be well represented. His remains were interred in the family grave at Prestbury Church.
My boys tried various things, John was a ham curer for a while, William a grain merchant and Robert, an apprentice law clerk, but he never stuck at that. They were all keen on breeding horses. Allan sadly died in 1884. But before he died he had bred a fine Clydesdale mare Nancey, sired by Prince Charlie-Dunmore. After Allan’s death John bred Nancey with his sire, St Lawrance, and he had another fine mare, called Jane Shore. By that time we had moved to Crossmill. It was a grand house, and John took on the running of the farm. Although they were grown men they didn’t act as responsibly as they should. Often they would settle there differences by the fist instead of the word. I was glad Jessie was a quiet girl. I was happy when she met James Sharp. He was from a good family. His father was a manager of the Levern Mill. James was a very fine looking young man, with quite an eye for the girls. I hoped he would settle down when he married Jessie in 1886. They moved into one of the houses at 130 Cross Arthurlie Street, and in July of the following year Jessie had twins. A boy and a girl. The boy was too weak to survive, but my grand daughter, Margaret Jane, after me, was strong. Jessie didn’t cope well with the loss of her first son. I wish she had a sister to give her support. Strong or not, it wasn’t long before I had a grandson, James, and then another, John. I do have another grandson, one we don’t talk about. William had a son by a local girl. He was far too young to get married and I certainly did not want to see him ruin his life. His older brothers agreed that it would be folly to marry. They concocted a plan, William would take one of their stallions to Australia. I didn’t want that, but he was keen for adventure. I was heart broken when he left. He said he would be back, but I just knew, I won’t see him again.
I am feeling very old now. The only brother I have left alive is William. Sandy died in 1892, but not before he had remarried. Give him his due it was a few years after Elizabeth died. He had become the licensee at the Traveller’s Rest, at the top of the Kirkhill Brae in Neilston. He met his new wife, Helen Hutcheson in Glasgow. She was a Spirit Dealer as well, so they had that in common. Although she was forty, and had been married before, they had a son, very soon after they married. He was called James, and he was only six when Alexander died. He had been ill and Helen thought that some good sea air would help him get his strength back. They took a trip to Rothesay in 1891, sadly his condition worsened and he died there. Helen is a capable woman and has taken over as licensee at The Travellers Rest.
Nannie had died in Canada, without ever returning to Scotland.
I can’t do much now, getting awkward on my pins. The grandchildren live here at Crossmill. They are too much for Jessie. The boys, especially Jimmy, enjoy helping their uncles on the farm. John is a bit more like his mother, he is a gentle type. A good artist too. I think he takes that from his father’s side though. Margaret Jane, Maggie we call her is as strong as I was when I was young, but she has a caring nature. They are all getting a good education, I just hope they have good health and prosper.
I am writing now, as I have no energy for hard work. The news has come that Queen Victoria has died. She reigned for sixty four years. I wonder if the Prince of Wales, as king, will be as well regarded as she was. I also worry about my own sons. None of them have married yet, although Robert seems quite keen on one of the maids. She is Marion Crawford. She’s a farmer daughter from Dalry in Ayrshire, and seems a good sensible type of woman. She’s about thirty now so will be looking for a husband. I am sure she will make a good farmer’s wife. Alexander’s health is not great. John is strong but more interested in breeding his dogs and hens. He has some very fine Minorca cockerels. He makes periodic trips to Islay, to buy cattle, but I often wonder if he has a woman there. He is like his father, so I would not think in questioning him. I seldom hear from William in Australia. He did send me a gold pin. He hopes to make his fortune out there, but I know I will not live long enough for that to happen.
Margaret Jane died at Crossmill on 7 September 1902 
Carswell, Margaret (I43)
 
90 18478/1969 ROOKE EVELYN JOHN CHARLOTTE JANE ST LEONARDS Fagan, Evelyn (I188)
 
91 1851 census Adlington Cheshire
Land Holes Farm Adlington.
John Stevenson, Unmarried,30, Farmer of 84 acres,employing 2 labourers, born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson, Brother, Unmarried, 28, Farmer, born Scotland.
Agnes Stevenson, Sister, Unmarried, 25, House maid, born Scotland.
Robert Stevenson,. Brother, Unmarried, 17, Agricultural Lab. born Scotland.
Fiona Campbell, Servant Unmarried, General Servant, Born Scotland.

1861 Census Adlington Cheshire.
Landholes Farm. Adlington.
John Stevenson, Head, Un M, 40, Farmer of 82 Acres Employ 2 Lab, born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson,Brother ,Unmarried,38, born Scotland.
Isabella Stevenson,Sister,Un M,18,House keeper, born Scotland.
Frank Butter ?,Servant. Unm , 24 ?,Cow Man, born Ireland.

1871 Census.
Landholes Farm Adlington.
John Stevenson , Head,Un m ,50, Farmer of 86 Acres, born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson, Brother, ,Unm, 48, Partner, born Scotland.
Eliza Robinson, Servant, Married, 44, House Keeper ,born Ireland.

Letter written by Thomas Carswell ( born Cheshire 1848 , married Hannah Marie Bradley) to his cousinAlexander Carswell? in Neilston Renfrew.
BollingGrove Prestbury N Macclesfield
Feb 9/ 1924
Dear Cousin,

. When Will. Handford ( John Stevenson’s son - outside the Blanket) was in New Zealand Invercargill ,he saw lots of Carswell names over shops and he went into the last one but only his son was in but he said he understood they came from the neighbourhood of Glasgow.

It seems that it was John Stevensons son who was born to Sarah Handford at Bradley Brow Farm 24 Oct 1854 named William Stevenson on Birth Cert. but latter called William Handford. Sarah later married Thomas Shadwell & ran the Old Rodney Inn at Prestbury.

Tom Shadwell from nearby Adlington became the innkeeper here. With the arrival of the railway Prestbury became a popular place to reside. In 1861 he is described as the publican here with his wife Sarah. They had seven children and employed a servant. There were many silk weavers in the vicinity at this period. Tom Shadwell died here on April 12th 1875 aged 53. His ghost is reputed to be one of the ghosts that haunt the Admiral Rodney.
The sound of children whispering, are alleged to have been heard also. At one period there were six alehouses and inns to be found in the village of Prestbury. In 1881 Sarah Shadwell lived here, and is described as a licensed victualler, with her daughter Ann, who helped at the inn and her son Will, who was a tea dealer, she employed Martha Bracegirdle aged 15 as a servant. Like a lot of properties in the village, The Admiral Rodney had been for some considerable time the property of the Legh Family of Adlington Hall. Prestbury "wakes" were held on the village roads, where roundabouts, Morris dancers, a greasy pole with a leg of mutton on top, swing-boats, coconut shies, and a performing monkey, between the 11th-17th July. In the village stood a bake house, where housewives took their own loaves to be baked in an oven heated by burning logs. Twice a year, Fairs were held on April 28th and October 22nd. The April Fair is noted for a large show of cattle. An annual event was the arrival of "Pig Nellie", an enormous woman, who came from Mobberley. She drove herself in a donkey cart and usually had six pigs to sell near the churchyard.

Bradley Brow. 1851 Census Adlington Cheshire.
Samual Hardford.Head Married, 46.Coal Agent & Farmer of 65 Acres employing 11 Labourers ,born Mellor Derbyshire.
Elizabeth Handford, Wife , 38, born Leeds.
Sarah Handford,Daughter,Unmarried,22, Farmers Daughter, born Stockport.
Joseph Handford, Son, 7, Scholar, Born Stockport.
Elizabeth Handford, 4,
Mary Handford, 3
Joseph Downs ,Servant, unmarried, 27


1881 Census Cheshire.
Dwelling: Admiral Rodney
Census Place: Butley, Cheshire, England
Source: FHL Film 1341835 PRO Ref RG11 Piece 3487 Folio 43 Page 1
Marr Age Sex Birthplace
Sarah SHADWELL W 52 F Stockport, Cheshire, England
Rel: Head
Occ: Licensed Victualler
Ann M. SHADWELL U 19 F Butley, Cheshire, England
Rel: Daughter
William HANDFORD U 26 M Butley, Cheshire, England
Rel: Son
Occ: Tin Dealer
Martha E. BRACEGIRDLE 13 F Prestbury, Cheshire, England
Rel: Servant
Occ: Domestic Servant

1901 Census.
William Handford 46 born Cheshire Butley,living at Staffordshire Hanley Grocer Shop Keeper.

Prestbury Churchyard gravestone:-Sacred to the memory of John Stevenson of Sandholes Adlington who died Dec 19 1871 aged 56. 
Stevenson, John (I147)
 
92 1851 census Adlington Cheshire
Land Holes Farm Adlington.
John Stevenson, Unmarried,30, Farmer of 84 acres,employing 2 labourers, born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson, Brother, Unmarried, 28, Farmer, born Scotland.
Agnes Stevenson, Sister, Unmarried, 25, House maid, born Scotland.
Robert Stevenson,. Brother, Unmarried, 17, Agricultural Lab. born Scotland.
Fiona Campbell, Servant Unmarried, General Servant, Born Scotland.

1861 Census Adlington.
Land Holes Farm, John Stevenson, Head, Unm, 40, Farmer of 84 Acres, Employing 2 Lab.Born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson, Brother, Un M, 38, born Scotland.
Isabella Stevenson, Sister, Unm, 18, House ? , born Scotland. 
Stevenson, Allan (I1202)
 
93 1851 census Adlington Cheshire
Land Holes Farm Adlington.
John Stevenson, Unmarried,30, Farmer of 84 acres,employing 2 labourers, born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson, Brother, Unmarried, 28, Farmer, born Scotland.
Agnes Stevenson, Sister, Unmarried, 25, House maid, born Scotland.
Robert Stevenson,. Brother, Unmarried, 17, Agricultural Lab. born Scotland.
Fiona Campbell, Servant Unmarried, General Servant, Born Scotland.

1901 census where he is listed as a boarder with John Dunlop's family.
Allan S death:- 1 May 1908 Allan Stevenson, farmer, single, at Springbank Kilarrow, age 86 father Hugh S mother Margaret C (both dec's) died of old age, not certified by medical person, John Dunlop nephew present, reg'd at Bowmore on 8 May. 
Stevenson, Allan (I148)
 
94 1851 census Adlington Cheshire
Land Holes Farm Adlington.
John Stevenson, Unmarried,30, Farmer of 84 acres,employing 2 labourers, born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson, Brother, Unmarried, 28, Farmer, born Scotland.
Agnes Stevenson, Sister, Unmarried, 25, House maid, born Scotland.
Robert Stevenson,. Brother, Unmarried, 17, Agricultural Lab. born Scotland.
Fiona Campbell, Servant Unmarried, General Servant, Born Scotland.

Letter written by Thomas Carswell ( born Cheshire 1848 , married Hannah Marie Bradley) to his cousinAlexander Carswell? in Neilston Renfrew.
BollingGrove Prestbury N Macclesfield
Feb 9/ 1924
Dear Cousin,

. When Will. Handford ( John Stevenson’s son - outside the Blanket) was in New Zealand Invercargill ,he saw lots of Carswell names over shops and he went into the last one but only his son was in but he said he understood they came from the neighbourhood of Glasgow.

It seems that it was John Stevensons son who was born to Sarah Handford at Bradley Brow Farm 24 Oct 1854 named William Stevenson on Birth Cert. but latter called William Handford. Sarah later married Thomas Shadwell & ran the Old Rodney Inn at Prestbury. 
Handforth, Sarah (I1252)
 
95 1851 census Adlington Cheshire
Land Holes Farm Adlington.
John Stevenson, Unmarried,30, Farmer of 84 acres,employing 2 labourers, born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson, Brother, Unmarried, 28, Farmer, born Scotland.
Agnes Stevenson, Sister, Unmarried, 25, House maid, born Scotland.
Robert Stevenson,. Brother, Unmarried, 17, Agricultural Lab. born Scotland.
Fiona Campbell, Servant Unmarried, General Servant, Born Scotland. 
Stevenson, Robert (I1208)
 
96 1851 census Adlington Cheshire
Land Holes Farm Adlington.
John Stevenson, Unmarried,30, Farmer of 84 acres,employing 2 labourers, born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson, Brother, Unmarried, 28, Farmer, born Scotland.
Agnes Stevenson, Sister, Unmarried, 25, House maid, born Scotland.
Robert Stevenson,. Brother, Unmarried, 17, Agricultural Lab. born Scotland.
Fiona Campbell, Servant Unmarried, General Servant, Born Scotland. 
Stevenson, Agnes (I1204)
 
97 1851 census Adlington Cheshire
Land Holes Farm Adlington.
John Stevenson, Unmarried,30, Farmer of 84 acres,employing 2 labourers, born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson, Brother, Unmarried, 28, Farmer, born Scotland.
Agnes Stevenson, Sister, Unmarried, 25, House maid, born Scotland.
Robert Stevenson,. Brother, Unmarried, 17, Agricultural Lab. born Scotland.
Fiona Campbell, Servant Unmarried, General Servant, Born Scotland. 
Stevenson, Robert (I157)
 
98 1851 census Adlington Cheshire
Land Holes Farm Adlington.
John Stevenson, Unmarried,30, Farmer of 84 acres,employing 2 labourers, born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson, Brother, Unmarried, 28, Farmer, born Scotland.
Agnes Stevenson, Sister, Unmarried, 25, House maid, born Scotland.
Robert Stevenson,. Brother, Unmarried, 17, Agricultural Lab. born Scotland.
Fiona Campbell, Servant Unmarried, General Servant, Born Scotland. 
Stevenson, Agnes (I150)
 
99 1851 census Adlington Cheshire
Sand Holes Farm Adlington.
John Stevenson, Unmarried,30, Farmer of 84 acres,employing 2 labourers, born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson, Brother, Unmarried, 28, Farmer, born Scotland.
Agnes Stevenson, Sister, Unmarried, 25, House maid, born Scotland.
Robert Stevenson,. Brother, Unmarried, 17, Agricultural Lab. born Scotland.
Fiona Campbell, Servant Unmarried, General Servant, Born Scotland.

1861 Census Adlington.
Sand Holes Farm,
John Stevenson, Head, Unm, 40, Farmer of 84 Acres, Employing 2 Lab.Born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson, Brother, Un M, 38, born Scotland.
Isabella Stevenson, Sister, Unm, 18, House ? , born Scotland.

1871 Census Adlington Allan Stevenson Enumerator
Sand Holes Farm .
John Stevenson, Head, Unmarr,50, Farmer of 86 acres, born Scotland.
Allan Stevenson, Brother, Unmarried, 48, Partner , born Scotland.
Eliza Robinson, Servant, Marr, 44, HouseKeeper, born Ireland.

Dwelling: Sandholes 1881
Census Place: Adlington, Cheshire, England
Source: FHL Film 1341835 PRO Ref RG11 Piece 3487 Folio 36 Page 8
Marr Age Sex Birthplace
John WARD M 31 M Mottram St Andrew, Cheshire, England
Rel: Head
Occ: Farmer 1 Lab (Of 85 Acres)
Mary WARD M 31 F Withington, Cheshire, England
Rel: Wife
Annie E. WARD 9 F Blackden, Cheshire, England
Rel: Daur
Occ: Scholar
Mary J. WARD 5 F Adlington, Cheshire, England
Rel: Daur
Occ: Scholar
William G. WARD 2 M Adlington, Cheshire, England
Rel: Son
Ann DUNCALF U 49 F Poynton, Cheshire, England
Rel: Serv
Occ: General Serv
George SHRIGLEY U 32 M Adlington, Cheshire, England
Rel: Serv
Occ: Farm Serv (Indoor)
James DAVIS U 21 M Macclesfield, Cheshire, England
Rel: Serv
Occ: Farm Serv (Indoor)


Letter written by Thomas Carswell ( born Cheshire 1848 , married Hannah Marie Bradley) to his cousin Alexander Carswell? in Neilston Renfrew.
" BollingGrove Prestbury N Macclesfield
Feb 9/ 1924
Dear Cousin,

. When Will. Handford ( John Stevenson’s son - outside the Blanket) was in New Zealand Invercargill ,he saw lots of Carswell names over shops and he went into the last one but only his son was in but he said he understood they came from the neighbourhood of Glasgow."

It seems that it was John Stevensons son who was born to Sarah Handford at Bradley Brow Farm 24 Oct 1854 named William Stevenson on Birth Cert. but latter called William Handford. Sarah later married Thomas Shadwell & ran the Old Rodney Inn at Prestbury.

"Tom Shadwell from nearby Adlington became the innkeeper here. With the arrival of the railway Prestbury became a popular place to reside. In 1861 he is described as the publican here with his wife Sarah. They had seven children and employed a servant. There were many silk weavers in the vicinity at this period. Tom Shadwell died here on April 12th 1875 aged 53. His ghost is reputed to be one of the ghosts that haunt the Admiral Rodney.
The sound of children whispering, are alleged to have been heard also. At one period there were six alehouses and inns to be found in the village of Prestbury. In 1881 Sarah Shadwell lived here, and is described as a licensed victualler, with her daughter Ann, who helped at the inn and her son Will, who was a tea dealer, she employed Martha Bracegirdle aged 15 as a servant. Like a lot of properties in the village, The Admiral Rodney had been for some considerable time the property of the Legh Family of Adlington Hall. Prestbury "wakes" were held on the village roads, where roundabouts, Morris dancers, a greasy pole with a leg of mutton on top, swing-boats, coconut shies, and a performing monkey, between the 11th-17th July. In the village stood a bake house, where housewives took their own loaves to be baked in an oven heated by burning logs. Twice a year, Fairs were held on April 28th and October 22nd. The April Fair is noted for a large show of cattle. An annual event was the arrival of "Pig Nellie", an enormous woman, who came from Mobberley. She drove herself in a donkey cart and usually had six pigs to sell near the churchyard.

Bradley Brow. 1851 Census Adlington Cheshire.
Samual Hardford.Head Married, 46.Coal Agent & Farmer of 65 Acres employing 11 Labourers ,born Mellor Derbyshire.
Elizabeth Handford, Wife , 38, born Leeds.
Sarah Handford,Daughter,Unmarried,22, Farmers Daughter, born Stockport.
Joseph Handford, Son, 7, Scholar, Born Stockport.
Elizabeth Handford, 4,
Mary Handford, 3
Joseph Downs ,Servant, unmarried, 27


1881 Census Cheshire.
Dwelling: Admiral Rodney
Census Place: Butley, Cheshire, England
Source: FHL Film 1341835 PRO Ref RG11 Piece 3487 Folio 43 Page 1
Marr Age Sex Birthplace
Sarah SHADWELL W 52 F Stockport, Cheshire, England
Rel: Head
Occ: Licensed Victualler
Ann M. SHADWELL U 19 F Butley, Cheshire, England
Rel: Daughter
William HANDFORD U 26 M Butley, Cheshire, England
Rel: Son
Occ: Tin Dealer
Martha E. BRACEGIRDLE 13 F Prestbury, Cheshire, England
Rel: Servant
Occ: Domestic Servant

1901 Census.
William Handford 46 born Cheshire Butley,living at Staffordshire Hanley Grocer Shop Keeper.

Possible death only:-
Cheshire Death indexes for the years: 1871
Surname Forename(s) Age Sub-District Registers At Reference
STEVENSON John 51 Prestbury Cheshire East PRE/7/94

Prestbury Churchyard gravestone:-Sacred to the memory of John Stevenson of Sandholes Adlington who died Dec 19 1871 aged 56.(Son of Margaret Carswell) 
Stevenson, John (I847)
 
100 1851 Census has Agnes 19 living at Crofthead with parents ,James & David.

1861 Census Adlington.
John Carswell ,Head, Married , 40, Farmer of 64 acres employing one Laborer. born Scotland.
Margaret Carswell , Wife, 38, Farmers wife, born Scotland.
Allan Carswell, Son, unm,16, born Scotland.
John Carswell, Son , 12, Scho;ar. Born Scotland.
Jane Carswell,Daug, 10 Scholar, born Adlington.
Margaret Carswell, daug, 10, Scholar, born Adlington.
Robert Carswell, Son, ? months, born Adlington.
Agnes Stevenson,Cousin, Un, 26 , Dairy Maid. Born Scotland.

Also found Agnes Brown, previously Carswell, nee Stevenson's death.
She died 7 November 1912, at 11 Arthurlie Street, Barrhead, age 81. She outlived her second husband too. Father listed as John Stevenson, Contractor (dec'd), mother Jean Stevenson ms Wark (decd) Oddly Wm Brown Son in law was the informant. I wonder if that should have been step son?
If you make anything of that, please let me know. Regards Johan. 
Stevenson, Agnes (I764)
 

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